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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 356 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 317 5 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 224 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 223 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 202 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 172 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 155 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 149 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 132 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Sterling Price or search for Sterling Price in all documents.

Your search returned 29 results in 7 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 16: operations on the Mississippi. (search)
g, Captain Leonard, dashed at her, she firing her heavy guns and retreating towards a bar where the depth of water would not be sufficient for our boats to follow. The Bragg continued boldly on under fire of nearly their whole fleet, and struck her a blow that stopped her further flight. The Bragg rounded to down the river under a broadside fire, and drifted until her tiller rope, that had got out of order, could be re-adjusted. A few moments after the Bragg struck her blow, the General Sterling Price, First-officer J. E. Harthorne, ran into the same boat aft, a little starboard of her amidships, carrying away her rudder, sternpost and a large piece of her stern. This threw the Cincinnatis' stern towards the Sumter, Captain M. W. Lamb, which struck her running at the utmost speed of his boat. The General Earl Van Dorn, Capt. Folkerson, running according to orders in the rear of the Price and Sumter, directed his attention to the Mound City, at the time throwing broadsides into
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
any dangerous service,--only one steamer was sunk by the enemy's shot. A sufficient number of gun boats had been left at the mouth of the Yazoo River to take care of the upper Mississippi, and to look out for two formidable rams that were building at Yazoo City, forty miles from the mouth of the river. Sherman remained with his division at Young's Point, ready to make another attack from the Yazoo if opportunity offered, and also to protect the supplies at Milliken's Bend from General Sterling Price, who with a large Confederate force was encamped some thirty miles away on the west bank of the Mississippi. The Mississippi Marine Brigade, consisting of two thousand men, under Brigadier-General Alfred Ellet, in six or seven large steamers, was left there. These flying troops were attached to the Navy. Every precaution had been taken to prevent a surprise from the Confederates, or any attempt on their part to fortify the river banks again in the absence of the Army. General
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
Vicksburg, June 19, by the Army and Navy. all the enemy's guns silenced. General Price's Army repulsed by General Mower and the marine brigade. energy shown by tvery effort was made to bring relief to the Confederates through Louisiana. General Price had been moving about some twelve miles from Young's Point among the swamps force of Federal troops at Young's Point and Milliken's Bend at this time, and Price might have gained a partial success, but nothing substantial. One attempt wat, and uniting the marine brigade with his troops he marched out to hunt up General Price's army,--found it and scattered it after a short and decisive battle. PricPrice's army now left this district and troubled it no more. This was the last hope of the besieged, if they had ever hoped anything from so forlorn a scheme, and they rce at Young's Point under General Mower, and that place was attacked by Major-General Price with 12,000 men, the marine brigade and the gun-boats united with Genera
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
en's bend. attack on Helena, Arkansas, by General Price. defeat of the enemy owing to the fire ofby a portion of the Confederate army under General Price. Milliken's Bend is but two or three mileshe Mississippi squadron. The Army under General Price, or his subordinate. General Holmes, whicish their stock by raids on these points. General Price therefore determined to change his base anr received information from deserters that General Price was moving with a large force from Arkansa General Prentiss was expecting an attack from Price with twelve to fourteen thousand troops, to opats on the river were hailed by deserters from Price's army, asking to be taken on board. No trooptroops hadstood manfully against the attack of Price's apparently overwhelming force, the slaughter Bache was informed that the indefatigable General Price was assembling an army at Brownsville, andittle flotilla was equal to a victory over General Price, whom it would have required an army of tw[1 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
ed the Little Red River on a bridge constructed by the soldiers. On the 10th of April the army moved to Prairie, where Price, the Confederate General, had determined to make a final stand at the point he had chosen; two branches diverge from the Confederates had learned that Banks had retreated to stay, and General Kirby Smith with 8,000 Confederates had joined General Price, and the combined forces were marching upon Steele's position. Under all the circumstances, with no hope of being jod a large force of infantry, was moving up the river to attack Little Rock. The combined forces of Confederates, under Price, made the attack, and were repulsed with great slaughter, losing a large part of their artillery and munitions of war. Steele held on for a few days longer to see if Price would make another attack, and then took up his line of march and joined the Army of the Tennessee. It does not require much military knowledge to see how much better Steele's expedition was mana
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
still held by our troops; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at from 7,000 to 10,000, held the country from Monroe to Camden and Arkadelphia, confronting Steele. Magruder could spare 10,000 of his force to resist an attack from the east, leaving his fortifications well garrisoned on the coast, while Price could furnish at least an additional 5,000 from the north, making a formidable army of from 25,000 to 30,000 men, equal to any forces that could be brought against them, even with the most perfect unity and co-operation of commands. This estimate of the strength of the enemy was given in my dispatch of February 2, but was thought, upon information received by the Government, to be exaggerated. The
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
.   Cotton, 14 bags Waiting for prize list of the General Sterling Price. 199 13 83 64 115 49 Springfield   General Sterling Price.   Cotton, 13 bales 2,694 24 334 79 2,359 45 Key West Mar. 29, 1864 Port Royal. Schooner Charm 9,756 25 1,0e, Louisville, Carondelet, Fort Hindman, Benton, Pittsburg, Mound City, Essex, Lexington, Ouachita, Cricket, Gazelle, General Price, W. H. Brown. [718 bales of cotton still pending.] Schooner Cecilia D 5,399 88 1,009 95 4,389 93 New Orleans May ctaw, Osage, Chillicothe, Louisville, Carondelet, Benton, Pittsburg, Mound City, Essex, Lexington, Ouachita, Gazelle, General Price, W. H. Brown.   Cotton, 75 bales Waiting for prize lists of Narcissus and Cowslip. 497 00 192 87 304 13 New Orlctaw, Osage, Chillicothe, Louisville, Carondelet, Benton, Pittsburg, Mound City, Essex, Lexington, Ouachita, Gazelle, General Price, W. H. Brown, Juliet.   Cotton, 10 1/2 bales 2,397 28 534 28 1,863 00 do Oct. 12, 1864 Cimarron. Steamer Ceres