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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 356 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 317 5 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 224 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 223 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 202 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 172 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 155 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 149 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 132 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Sterling Price or search for Sterling Price in all documents.

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to assemble, not one avowed Disunionist was found among its members. Even Sterling Price, a Democratic ex-Governor, who in due time became one of the ablest and mos forces. Nine days thereafter, lie entered into a truce or compact with Gen. Sterling Price, whereof the object was the pacification of Missouri. But this did not American flag should be planted within its limits. Gen. Harney's compact with Price, proving a protection to treason only, was repudiated at Washington, and Gen. Hc., etc. Very soon, June 11th. an interview was had, at St. Louis, between Gen. Price, on behalf of the Governor, and Gen. Lyon and Col. Blair, on the side of the Union; whereat Gen. Price demanded, as a vital condition of peace, that no Federal troops should be stationed in, or allowed to pass through, the State. Gen. Lyon peremptorily refused compliance. Jackson and Price returned that night to Jefferson City; and the next morning brought tidings to St. Louis that the Gasconade railroa
d that it was to his State that each citizen owed his first and highest duty. A favored officer in our regular army transmitted his resignation, to be tendered in case his State seceded, and was not cashiered therefor, as he should have been promptly and finally. All over the South, men said, This Secession is madness — it will ruin all concerned — I have resisted it to the best of my ability — but my State has seceded nevertheless, and I must go with my State. But, on the other hand, Sterling Price, Humphrey Marshall, James B. Clay, Richard Hawes, Simon B. Buckner, William Preston, Charles S. Morehead, and scores like them — in good part old Whigs, who could not help knowing better — never seemed to imagine that the refusal of their respective States to secede laid them under the smallest obligation to restrain their traitorous propensities. State Sovereignty was potent only to authorize and excuse treason to the Union--never to restrain or prevent it. XIII. The Southern l
tate, and was here joined on the 3d of July by Price, with such aid as he had been able to gather athat night and next morning, by the arrival of Price from the southward, bringing to his aid severaough all this section, until he finally joined Price, with 2,700 men, at the siege of Lexington. I to Springfield. The Rebels, now commanded by Price, their best General, advanced slowly and waril the frontier of Arkansas; Gens. McCulloch and Price having failed to agree upon the plan of a camp Reliable information from the vicinity of Price's column shows his present force to be 11,000 oubtless had been advised that they would find Price on their arrival. Two parties of Unionists stnder. Of course, no terms could now be made. Price agreed that the privates on our side should be army, preparatory to a pursuit of Jackson and Price, who, it was reasonably supposed, would not sutoo strong to be beaten; and might have routed Price near Pineville, chasing the wreck of has army [23 more...]
of success and superiority gilding our standards, and with at least nine-tenths of the whole region securely in our hands. In Missouri, Gen. Fremont-though vehemently reproached for not advancing and fighting sooner, and though never enjoying facilities for obtaining arms, munitions, or any material of war, at all comparable to those at all times eagerly accorded to McClellan — had collected, organized, armed, and provided, a movable column of nearly 40,000 men, at whose head he had pushed Price--one of the very ablest of the Rebel chieftains — to the furthest corner of the State, and was on the point of hunting him thence into Arkansas or eternity, when the order which deprived him of his command was received at Springfield on the 2d of November. Yet then and throughout the Winter, Gen. McClellan, who had been called to command at Washington on the same day that Fremont left New York for St. Louis, stood cooped up and virtually besieged in the defenses of Washington, holding barel
r, Col. Frank P., 490; has an interview with Gen. Price, 491; his strictures on Gen. Scott, 543-9; 5ch at Columbia, 332. Boyd, Col., reinforces Price at Lexington, 587. Boyd, Linn, of Ky., 208;17. Burnett, L. W., of N. J., letter from Gov. Price to, 439. Burnett, Thos. L., of Ky., Rebeerson City, 586; 587; is directed to intercept Price, 589. Davis, Henry Winter, votes for Penninas, captured by Montgomery, 285; occupied by Gen. Price, 585. Fort Smith, Ark., seized by Solon B Harney, Gen. Wm. S., makes a compact with Gen. Price; is superseded, 491. Harper's Ferry, 414; 578; 581; his proclamation, 582; is joined by Price at Neosho, 589. McGowan, Mr., of S. C., in victor at Scarytown, 524; marches to reinforce Price at Lexington, 587. Patriot and Union, The, 's Commissioners to President Lincoln, 452. Price, Gov. Rodman M., to L. W. Burnett, 439. PriPrice, Gen. Sterling, his election to the Missouri Convention, 488; makes a compact with Harney; has a[1 more...]