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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 356 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 317 5 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 305 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 224 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 223 3 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 202 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 172 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 155 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 149 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 132 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights. You can also browse the collection for Sterling Price or search for Sterling Price in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

there should be a new and up-to-date convention, especially as the old one, owing to the desertion of many of its treasonably inclined members, including General Sterling Price, of the Confederate Army, who was its first president, had become a rump, and so there were old-conventionists and new-conventionists. The old-conventiont this time it can be safely said that nowhere, outside of hell, was there such a horrible condition as prevailed in Missouri. Singly and in squads a good many of Price's men returned from the South, and with local sympathizers forming guerrilla bands under such leaders as Bill Anderson, Poindexter, Jackson, and Quantrell, soon hoops under Generals Pleasanton and A. J. Smith. These were sent through the State. The effect was almost magical. Some of the guerrilla bands went South to join Price, but the most of them dissolved and disappeared. Their members, doubtless, went back to their former occupations, and that was the last of them. Missouri was pac
ed. The man was the late General Thomas Ewing, then a resident of Kansas. At that particular time he was in the Army and the commandant of the St. Louis District in Missouri. Lane came to St. Louis and had a talk with the writer, freely admitting his dread of Ewing and asking for the Missouri Democrat's support. Having a considerable admiration for Lane as well as a liking for the man, I promised him such assistance as I could reasonably give. It happened to be at the time when General Sterling Price, in making his last raid into Missouri, was threatening St. Louis with an army of nearly twenty thousand men, and there was no adequate opposing force at hand. Ewing, with barely a tenth as many troops, went to the front and heroically engaged the enemy. With no protection but the walls of a little mud fort he succeeded in repelling the attack of his powerful adversary. That timely action probably saved St. Louis. At this particular time it was arranged that there should be a m
Dresser, Amos, whipped, 119. E Emancipation proclamation, 137-138; due to Abolitionists, 2; story of, 139; moral influence of, 146; Lincoln's reasons for, 146; ineffective, 148; text of, 211-213. Ewing, Gen. Thomas, 194; repulsion of General Price, 195. F Field, David Dudley, 179. Fish, W. H., 205. Fletcher, Thomas C., 155. Fort Donelson, capture of, 184, 192. Fort Henry, capture of, 184. Foss, A. T., 205. Foster, Daniel, 205. Foster, Stephen, 39. Free-soil party, 65. Fremons., 106-107. Pillsbury, Parker, 204. Pleasanton, General, 168. Pointdexter, 165. Popular sovereignty, 153. Powell, Aaron M., 205. Prayer of Twenty Millions, The, 142; text of, 214-215. Prentice, John, 203. Presidential campaign of 1844, 7. Price, General Sterling, 160, 195. Prohibitionists, 2, 3, 14. Purviss, Robert, 203. Putnam, George M., 205. Q Quantrell, 65. R Rankin, John, 203. Raymond, Henry J., Life of Lincoln, 177. Redmond, C. L., 205. Republican party, 2, 3, 7, 8