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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Benjamin Young Prime or search for Benjamin Young Prime in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
ic; nothing was needed but inspiration, and the air was full of that. Far above the average is the rather fine Eulogium on Major-General Joseph Warren, written by A Columbian ; but the vast majority of these historic and eulogistic narratives serve but to exemplify the heights of patriotism and the depths of bathos. The elaborate and laboured elegies on Washington are as numerous and as futile as might be expected. The finest eulogy on Washington was written prior to his death by Dr. Benjamin Young Prime in a pindaric ode of 1400 lines entitled Columbia's glory, or British pride Humbled, which, in spite of its conventional form and style and lack of imagination, contains passages of admirable rhetoric. Closely related to the narratives and eulogies are the many and lengthy poems belonging to the philosophic and didactic glory of America type, of which Freneau seems to have been the originator. The most prolific poet of this school was Colonel David Humphreys (1753-1818), who gr
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
rt Folio, 180, 234, 237 n. Porteus, Bishop, 263 Pory, John, 14 Postl, Karl Anton, see Sealsfield, Charles Potowatomy's land, 2 Power, Tyrone, 189 Power of fancy, the, 181 Power of sympathy, the, 285, 307 Powers of genius, 165 Prairie, the, 208, 297, 299-300, 319 Prairies, the, 212 Precaution, 294 Preface to the speech of Joseph Galloway, 98 Prelude, the, 197, 213 Prescott, 277, 309 Price, Richard, 91, 97, 102, 147 Priestley, 91, 97, 99, 102 Prime, Dr., Benjamin Young, 168 Prince, Rev. Thomas, 20, 27-28, 113 Prince of Parthia, the, 216, 217, 225, 232 Prince Society, 28 Principles (Bishop Berkeley), 58 Prior, 112, 116, 175, 176, 177, 178, x80 Probus, 324 Procter, Bryan Waller (Barry Cornwall), 243 Progress of Dullness, 172 Prompter, 233 Prose (of Bryant), 277 n., 282 n. Prose sketches and poems, 319 Providence gazette, 128 Publications of the colonial Society of Massachusetts, 120 n. Puffendorf, 53 Purch