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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
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n H. E. Tinkham, serious gunshot wounds, and contusions of left, arm, side, thigh, and leg, by fragments of shell from the rebel ram Tennessee, no fracture; Peter R. Post, landsman, gunshot wound and fracture of right cheek-bone, serious; Charles Sanders, Master-at-Arms, slight contusion of lips; J. D. Ireson, Captain of the Hold, Isaac Fisher, (colored,) first-class boy, and several others, very slight contusions, by fragments of shell from the Tennessee, and splinters caused by it; and Kimball Prince, landsman, contusion of right shoulder, slight, by splinter caused by a solid shot from the Fort. Very respectfully, George W. Hatch, Acting Assistant-Surgeon, United States Navy. Lieut. Com. W. P. Mccann, U. S. N., Commanding United States Steamer Kennebec. Loss of the U. S. Steamer Philippi: report of rear-admiral D. G. Farragut. flag-ship Hartford, Mobile Bay, Aug. 8, 1864. sir: I regret to inform the Department, that after I had passed the forts some time, I saw a ste
whole column would follow on. Every thing being then in readiness, no time was squandered, and the order was given to advance. It was then noontime, and Brigadier-General Prince, on General Warren's right, was notified of this movement. The whole column then pressed on, and soon caught up with the retreating rebels, whom they drld the railroad to the plank road, and was obliged to call upon General Webb for assistance, the rebels having pushed their line of skirmishes between him and General Prince. General Webb's division had previously supplied one brigade to General Caldwell, which took position on the right of the corps in front. General Warren, i troops in two lines to the right, reaching the railroad. General Webb, commanding Second division, Second corps, joined General Hayes's forces, uniting with General Prince, commanding Seccond division, Third corps, which was also formed in two lines. General Carr, Third division, Third corps, next followed, in two parallel line
ge, to operate either west, east, or north from that point. The Seventh Illinois cavalry, five hundred strong, under Colonel Prince, had previously been moved to Bolivar, and, on the twenty-fourth, a portion of his regiment became engaged with one thousand of Richardson's troops. Finding his force overpowered, Colonel Prince fell back to Summerville, where they remained for the night. Next morning, (twenty-fifth,) he again moved forward, and finding his advance opposed, made a precipitous arisoners. During the fight at Summerville, between the Seventh Illinois cavalry and a part of Richardson's troops, Colonel Prince, in trying to rally his men, became separated from the main body, and, after the regiment had cut its way out, manages that just as the fight near Summerville commenced he arrived on the ground with a despatch from General Grierson to Colonel Prince. Finding himself surrounded and unable to escape, he sprang from his horse and crawled under a house; but fearing th
orily ordered to act strictly on the defensive, called off his troops from the pursuit, and the Twenty-ninth recrossed the river the same night. Sending out a reconnoissance the next morning, under Lieutenant-Colonel Schadt, of the Thirtieth Missouri, it was found that the enemy had never halted in his flight until ten miles from the field of battle, and that they were then in full and rapid retreat toward Trinity or Harrisonburgh. The forces of the enemy were Texan troops, General (or Prince) Polignac's brigade, consisting of the Seventeenth consolidated Texas, Colonel Taylor, three Texan regiments, Colonels Alexander, Stephens, and Hopp, and one battalion Louisiana cavalry, Major Caldwell. The fight was plainly visible from the bluffs of Natchez — every movement of the enemy, every change of our men could be distinctly seen, and the male and female citizens of this loyal city, who had lined the banks to see their brave boys drive the Yankees and niggers into the river, had the