Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for George E. Pugh or search for George E. Pugh in all documents.

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allory, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Slidell, Thomson, of N. J., Tnt, King, of New York, Ten Eyck, of New Jersey, Pugh and Wade, of Ohio, Trumbull, of Illinois, Brighwa--21.--every Democratic Senator present but Mr. Pugh, of Ohio, voting for it; though Messrs. Lathae up of the twenty Republicans aforesaid, and Mr. Pugh. Neither Mr. Crittenden, nor either of the M, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Polk, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Toombs, Trumbull, Wade, and on the first resolve, less Brown, Mallory, and Pugh; Nays 12--Bingham, Chandler, Dixon, Foot, Foster, Hale, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson. 0 7. Resolved, That the provision o distinguished friend, the Senator from Ohio (Mr. Pugh), who, but a few nights since, told us from t an advanced step from the Democratic party. [Mr. Pugh here read the resolves of the Alabama Democra and our mouths in the dust. Gentlemen, said Mr. Pugh, you mistake us--we will not do it. The S[2 more...]
aken on this substitute, which was adopted, as follows: Yeas.--Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson-25 [all Republicans]. Nays.--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian-23 [all Democrats, but two Bell-Conservatives, in italics]. Messrs. Iverson, of Georgia, Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana, Hemphill and Wigfall, of Texas, and R. W. Johnson, of Arkansas--who had voted just before against taking up the Kansas bill-had now absented themselves or sat silent, and allowed Mr. Clark's resolves to supplant Mr. Crittenden's, which were thus defeated. They doubtless did this in obedience to a resolve, preconcerted with Messrs. Da
concurred in by the Senate: Yeas 24; Nays 12: as follows: Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bigler, Bright, Crittenden, Dixon, Douglas, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Harlan, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Mason, Morrill, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Ten Eyck, and Thomson-24. Nays--Messrs. Bingham, Chandler, Clark, Doolittle, Durkee, Foot, King, Sumner, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson--12. And then the Senate returned to the consideration of the Crittenden proposrs. Crittenden, Douglas, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Morrill, and Thomson-7. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bingham, Bright, Chandler, Clark, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Hunter, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wigfall, Wilkinson, and Wilson--28. So the Senate, by four to one, disposed of the scheme of the Peace Commissioners, and proceeded to vote, directly thereafter, on Mr. Crittenden's original
incoln, 452. Price, Gov. Rodman M., to L. W. Burnett, 439. Price, Gen. Sterling, his election to the Missouri Convention, 488; makes a compact with Harney; has an interview with Gen. Lyon, 491; allusion to, 509; is appointed Major-General, 574; resigns tho command to McCulloch, at Wilson's Creek, 578; wounded, 582; besieges Lexington, 585-6; captures Lexington, 589; retreats to Pineville, 590; will not yield Missouri without a battle, 593. Pryor; Roger A., visits Fort Sumter, 448. Pugh, Geo. E., of Ohio, at Charleston, 322. Punta Arenas, surrender of Walker at, 276. Q. Quakers, the, assist Lundy in North Carolina, 113; their opposition to Slavery, 117-18; they petition Congress for abolition in the Federal District, 144. Quincy, Josiah, of Boston, threatens contingent secession, 85. Quitman, John A., in the Democratic Convention of 1856, 246; a filibuster, 270; statement of with regard to Senator Douglas, 512. R. Rains, Gen., one of Jackson's Brigadiers