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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
regard to slavery. Some of them refrain from eating flesh and drinking tea and coffee. Some are so bewildered that they won't fight in the way of Christian retaliation, to the great disturbance of the churches they belong to, and the annoyance of their pastors. They do not embrace these new-fangled notions as abolitionists—but then one fanaticism leads to another, and Cf. ante, 2.423. they are getting to be mono-maniacs, as the Reverend brother Punchard called us, on every subject. George Punchard. Rogers's light-heartedness was manifested under difficulties. In January the circulation of the Herald of Freedom had dwindled to some 900, and, the publisher being unable to sustain it, the New Hampshire Society had to take the paper on their hands again. J. R. French and two other boys, as Quincy wrote to Collins, print it for nothing, asking only board and clothes. Ms. Jan. 30, 1841. In July, a frank review of the struggles of paper and editor, made Herald of Freedom, 7.82,