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ucceeded in killing four of the rebels and taking some prisoners.--St. Louis Democrat. The steamer Gordon, (Nassau,) whilst attempting to run the blockade of Wilmington, N. C., was captured by the gunboats State of Georgia and Victoria.--The bombardment of Fort Pillow on the Mississippi was resumed after nearly a week of quiet on the part of the Union troops.--Baltimore American, June 3. A fight took place near Corinth, Miss., between a force of Union troops under the command of Col. Purcell of the Tenth Iowa regiment and a brigade of rebel infantry, resulting in the defeat of the rebels with considerable loss. The Speaker of the House of Representatives at Washington laid before the House a message from the President, referring to the history of the commencement of hostilities, and his exercise of the broad powers of the Constitution to preserve the capital of the country during the absence of Congress. Incidentally with this, he referred to the arrangements with Gov.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 14: the great Uprising of the people. (search)
were streaming from windows, floating over housetops, and fluttering from rude poles by the waysides. Little children waved them with tiny huzzas, as our train passed by, crowded to its utmost capacity with young men hastening to enroll themselves for the great Union Army then forming. Cincinnati was fairly iridescent with the Red, White, and Blue. From the point of the spire of white cut stone of the Roman Catholic Cathedral, two hundred and twenty-five feet in the air, the loyal Archbishop Purcell had caused to be unfurled, with imposing ceremonies, it was said, a magnificent National flag, ninety feet in length ; The ceremonies attending the raising of the flag, wrote the Archbishop in a letter to the author, July 23, 1865, in reply to a question concerning it, consisted of the hurrahs, the tears of hope and joy, the prayer for success from the blessing of God on our cause and arms by our Catholic people and our fellow-citizens of various denominations, who saluted the flag
other half was obtained by Mr. Crenshaw, the proprietor of the Spottswood House, where Jeff. Davis and family are quartered. Notwithstanding all the precautions which have been taken, goods of great importance to the insurgents are still occasionally forwarded to them from the North. On the Fourth of July thirty barrels of linseed oil arrived there from the city of Philadelphia, and was of great use to them in the manufacture of oilcloth for haversacks and knapsacks. It was obtained by Purcell & Co., of Richmond; and it might not be amiss for our authorities to inquire what one of our establishments furnished it. About six weeks ago buckles and sewing-thread, for the manufacture of military equipments, became very scarce; but Mr. King, of the firm of King & Lambert, went to Massachusetts, by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, and obtained a good supply, which he took back with him by the same route. There is still plenty of employment for all who understand any trades u
ir position taken by the Iowa First. General Lyon had previously had a poor opinion of the fighting qualities of these men, formed more from supposition than upon any real failure in duty; but now the time had come for him to reverse his judgment, which he did after their first repulse of the enemy. They fought like tigers, drove the enemy back, and followed up the advantage gained for a considerable distance. Captain Mason, Company C, was killed soon after his regiment was engaged. Lieutenant Purcell was mortally wounded. Major Porter and Colonel Merritt, gallantly cheering on their boys, escaped unharmed. The Kansas First and Second regiments were now ordered forward to support the right flank of the Iowas. Colonel Green's regiment of Tennessee cavalry, bearing a secession flag, now charged upon our wounded, who were partially guarded by one or two companies of infantry. Seeing the movement, Captain Totten poured a few rounds of canister into their ranks just in time to save
ir position taken by the Iowa First. General Lyon had previously had a poor opinion of the fighting qualities of these men, formed more from supposition than upon any real failure in duty; but now the time had come for him to reverse his judgment, which he did after their first repulse of the enemy. They fought like tigers, drove the enemy back, and followed up the advantage gained for a considerable distance. Captain Mason, Company C, was killed soon after his regiment was engaged. Lieutenant Purcell was mortally wounded. Major Porter and Colonel Merritt, gallantly cheering on their boys, escaped unharmed. The Kansas First and Second regiments were now ordered forward to support the right flank of the Iowas. Colonel Green's regiment of Tennessee cavalry, bearing a secession flag, now charged upon our wounded, who were partially guarded by one or two companies of infantry. Seeing the movement, Captain Totten poured a few rounds of canister into their ranks just in time to save
s Terry, Home Guard, leg, twice. G. Land, Home Guard, foot. Capt. Bradley, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, leg. Leroy Rankin, Home Guard, left shoulder. Rev. Carter Page, Home Guard, leg. James S. Frizell, Home Guard, side, slightly. Mr. St. Thomas, Home Guard, chest and face. James Dickey, Home Guard, both sides and shoulder. T. J. Vemont, Home Guard, both thighs. B. T. Amos, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, left arm. James H. Orr, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, right arm. Mr. Purcell, Eighteenth Kentucky, abdomen. William Nourse, Home Guard, side, slightly. I am glad to say to the friends of the wounded, that we are well prepared to afford relief to all who are in our care. We have received marked attention and assistance at the hands of Drs. John Kirkpatrick, W. O. Smith, McCloud, and others, to whom we feel very thankful. Very respectfully, etc., John A. Lair, Acting Assistant-Surgeon Seventh Kentucky Cavalry. A soldier's report. The Pleasant
the storm of bullets, encouraging his brave boys, who had so lately suffered at Iuka, to remember their duty, and, although severely wounded, remained with his regiment until it marched off the field. Majors Cunningham, of the Fifteenth, and Purcell, of the Sixteenth, did their whole duty and conducted themselves with great bravery. Two companies of the Thirteenth Iowa, company A, in command of Capt. Kennedy, and company G, in command of Capt. Walker, had before the engagement commenced be, the Eleventh Iowa was under command of Lieut.-Colonel Hall, the Thirteenth under Lieut.-Colonel John Shane, the Fifteenth, after the first day and during the pursuit, under command of Col. Reid, and the Sixteenth, after the first day, under Major Purcell. The origade, during the protracted movements of the battle and pursuit, encountering every hardship and privation incident to such campaigning, behaved with great fortitude — meeting every danger and hardship cheerfully; and I acknowledge m
the storm of bullets, encouraging his brave boys, who had so lately suffered at Iuka, to remember their duty, and, although severely wounded, remained with his regiment until it marched off the field. Majors Cunningham, of the Fifteenth, and Purcell, of the Sixteenth, did their whole duty and conducted themselves with great bravery. Two companies of the Thirteenth Iowa, company A, in command of Capt. Kennedy, and company G, in command of Capt. Walker, had before the engagement commenced be, the Eleventh Iowa was under command of Lieut.-Colonel Hall, the Thirteenth under Lieut.-Colonel John Shane, the Fifteenth, after the first day and during the pursuit, under command of Col. Reid, and the Sixteenth, after the first day, under Major Purcell. The origade, during the protracted movements of the battle and pursuit, encountering every hardship and privation incident to such campaigning, behaved with great fortitude — meeting every danger and hardship cheerfully; and I acknowledge m
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Traitorous and incendiary Legends. (search)
Traitorous and incendiary Legends. Richmond, April 22.--Yesterday morning the walls of the houses of Purcell, Ladd & Co., E. B. Spence & Co., Binford & Porter, the Powhatan House, and other conspicuous establishments about the town, were covered with incendiary and blasphemous writings, a verbatim copy of some of which we giveat the writer was an indifferent poet and an illiterate and blasphemous man, there can be but one opinion among those who scan the writing on the walls. On Purcell, Ladd & Co.'s east wall: On Yorktown's walls the cry is still they come. Change your bells into cannon, and charge with confederate 5‘s. Southern Lexibably by the watchman on his way to extinguish the lamps at the corner. At an early hour of the day all these ribald inscriptions, except those on the house of Purcell, Ladd & Co.,and E. B. Spence & Co., were effaced by the proprietors of the different houses. Those of the latter places, owing no doubt to the fact that the owne
and rapidly brought into action, when necessary. My arrangements were accordingly made; and early dawn of twentieth June found the reserve artillery distributed thus: Major Charles Richardson, with two batteries of his battalion, those of Purcell and Milledge, on the heights near Mechanicsville Bridge. Two batteries, those of Lane, from Lieutenant Cobbett's battalion, and of Woolfolk, from Major Richardson's battalion, some distance down the Chickahominy, near Mrs. Price's house, where t large guns along the hill's summit down the stream. The route we found impracticable; and as guns of short range were unavailing, those batteries which had been under fire for several days were sent to the rear. Later in the day, however, Captain Purcell was permitted to take one of the long-range guns to the front, on theNine-mile road, in the hope of an opportunity for service there; and subsequently, Major Richardson succeeded in bringing the other by the same road with a similar hope. M
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