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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 5 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 6 (search)
acation, on purpose to have a fire ready for me in my room on my return from a journey. I think it was on that very evening that he read aloud to me from Krummacher's Parables, a book then much liked among us,--selecting that fine tale describing the gradual downfall of a youth of unbounded aspirations, which the author sums up with the terse conclusion, But the name of that youth is not mentioned among the poets of Greece. It was thus with Hurlbert when he died, although his few poems in Putnam's magazine --Borodino, Sorrento, and the like — seemed to us the dawn of a wholly new genius; and I remember that when the cool and keen-sighted Whittier read his Gan Eden, he said to me that one who had written that could write anything he pleased. Yet the name of the youth was not mentioned among the poets; and the utter indifference with which the announcement of his death was received was a tragic epitaph upon a wasted life. Thanks to a fortunate home training and the subsequent infl
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 8 (search)
ing boy who made it died a few years after in the Civil War, a brevet brigadier-general, at the age of twenty. I had previously written an article for the North American review, another for the Christian Examiner, and three papers in prose for Putnam's magazine, one of these latter being a description of a trip to Mount Katahdin, written as a jeu d'esprit in the assumed character of a lady of the party. A few poems of mine had also been accepted by the last-named periodical; but these had atestion, indeed, the enterprise very nearly went to pieces; and Mr. Sanborn has printed in his Life of Alcott a characteristic letter from Emerson to myself, after I had, in order to test the matter, placed the names of Elizabeth Peabody and Mary Lowell Putnam — Lowell's sister, and also well known as a writer — on the nomination book. Emerson himself, with one of those serene and lofty coups d'etat of which only the saints are capable, took a pen and erased these names, although the question ha
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
ey, C. C., 13. Plato, 1010x, 158, 18&. Plunkett, Sergeant, 345. Plutarch, 5, 57, 171. Pollock, Sir, Frederick, 280, 281, 297. Pollock, Lady 280, 292. Pope, Alexander, I, 5. Pottawatomie Massacre, The, approved in Kansas, 207. Poverty, compensations of, 359. Pratt, Dexter, 12. Pratt, Rowena, 12. Precocity, perils of, 68. Preston, Colonel, 206. Prescott, W. H., 82. Prohibitory Laws, 120 Proudhon, P. J., 364. Provincialism, advantages of, for children, 3. Putnam, Mary Lowell, 173. Puttenham, George, 95. Pythagoras, 158. Quincy, Edmund, 178, 179, 244. Quincy; Josiah, 56, 71. Quintilian, 360. Rabelais, Francis, 18r. Rainsford, W. S., 98. Raynal, W. T. F., 15. Redpath, James, 206, 226. Rees, Abraham, 31. reformer, the rearing of A, 100-131. Remond, C. L., 174, 327. Retzsch, Moritz, 79. Revere, John, 54. Reynolds, Sir, Joshua, 79. Ribera, Jose, 295. Rice, Mr., 233. Rice, W. W., 164. Richard, King, 60. Richardson, James, 106. Ric
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
ith less cheerful signs even than Italy; but the day for both will come. Of this I have an undoubting faith. Have I told you that among the crowds in Europe are Mr. and Mrs. Putnam,—the latter the sister of James Russell Lowell, and the author of the learned and admirable articles which overthrew Bowen? Mrs. Mary Lowell Putnat among the crowds in Europe are Mr. and Mrs. Putnam,—the latter the sister of James Russell Lowell, and the author of the learned and admirable articles which overthrew Bowen? Mrs. Mary Lowell Putnam contested Prof. Francis Bowen's view of the Hungarian question. She is a beautiful lady as well as a most accomplished scholar. at among the crowds in Europe are Mr. and Mrs. Putnam,—the latter the sister of James Russell Lowell, and the author of the learned and admirable articles which overthrew Bowen? Mrs. Mary Lowell Putnam contested Prof. Francis Bowen's view of the Hungarian question. She is a beautiful lady as well as a most accomplished sch