hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for Pym or search for Pym in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
and to hesitate about administering the sacrament to profane swearers and tipplers. But while Baxter, in the seclusion of his parish, was painfully weighing the arguments for and against the wearing of surplices, the use of marriage rings, and the prescribed gestures and genuflections of his order, tithing with more or less scruple of conscience the mint and anise and cummin of pulpit ceremonials, the weightier matters of the law, freedom, justice, and truth were claiming the attention of Pym and Hampden, Brook and Vane, in the Parliament House. The controversy between King and Commons had reached the point where it could only be decided by the dread arbitrament of battle. The somewhat equivocal position of the Kidderminster preacher exposed him to the suspicion of the adherents of the King and Bishops. The rabble, at that period sympathizing with the party of license in morals and strictness in ceremonials, insulted and mocked him, and finally drove him from his parish. On