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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for M. Quad or search for M. Quad in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
lads, his mortuary burlesques go far to justify Augustine Birrell's dictum that the essence of American humour consists in speaking lightly of dreadful subjects. In spite of his pseudonym Clark was not one of the many dialect writers. The verbal humours of German-American speech were further exhibited, however, in the Yawcob Strauss rhymes of Charles Follen Adams. Negro dialect and certain broad aspects of darky pretentiousness were turned to laughable effect by Charles Bertrand Lewis (M. Quad) in The Lime-Kiln Club (1887) and other sketches. At the close of the century Bowery slang gained a temporary currency through the Chimmie Fadden stories of Edward Waterman Townsend, but Faddenism never seriously disturbed the cult of Mr. Dooley, whose Irish-American witticisms deserve more extended mention. A remarkable type of later slang, that in vented by an author and yet perfectly intelligible to all alert Americans, reached its apogee in the work of George Ade, whose Fables in slan
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
the Valley of the great Salt Lake, the, 151 Morning call (San Francisco), 4 Morris, Clara, 271 Morris, G. S., 239 n. Morse, Jedidiah, 401, 431, 546, 54 Morse, S. F. B., 345, 348 Morte d'arthur, 17 Morton, Martha, 290 Morton, Nathaniel, 533 Morton oder die Grosse tour, 579 Moth and the flame, the, 274, 280 Motley, 126, 178, 188, 190, 302, 306, 472 Mountaineering in the Sierra Nevada, 158 Mount Holyoke Seminary, 411 Mower in Ohio, the, 59 Mozart, 449, 450 M. Quad. See Lewis, Charles Bertrand Mr. Dooley. See Dunne, F. P. Mr. Isaacs, 87 Mrs. Bumpstead Leigh, 294 Mrs. Leffingwell's boots, 283 Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage patch, 288 Mr. Waddy's Return, 68 n. Muhlenberg, H. M., 577 Muir, John, 112, 116, 167 Muller, Max, 469 Muller, Wilhelm, 582 Mulligan guard ball, the, 279 Munch, Friedrich, 587 Muinchausen, Baron, 580 Mundartlich Heiteres, 583 Munger, T. T., 208 Munro, 463 Munsey's, 316, 317 Munsterberg, Hugo, 5