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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 9 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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th Tennessee, Colonel Voorhies; eight companies of the Twenty-seventh Alabama, Colonel Hughes. Quarles's regiment, the Forty-second Tennessee, came up, in reserve to this brigade. To the left of Henois, Colonel Smith, was brought up to their support, and again they attempted to assault. But Quarles's Forty-second Tennessee had arrived on the ground, in the mean time, to Heiman's assistance; a the strength of mine. Toward the close of the action I was reinforced by the regiments of Colonels Quarles, and Sugg, and Bailey. The Forty-second, Forty-ninth, and Fiftieth Tennessee; the two la right of the Forty-ninth. The right wing was likewise reinforced by Major Colms's battalion. Quarles's regiment, the Forty-second Tennessee, also came up from Heiman's position, and helped Hanson ederals that evening. This interior line had timely reinforcements in the arrival of Bailey's, Quarles's, Sugg's, and the balance of Head's regiments, all of which arrived after the forward movement
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 40 (search)
and I think, unless some terrible misfortune happens to our arms, the invader will surely be soon hurled from our soil. What President Lincoln came to Grant for is merely conjecture-unquestionably he could not suggest any military enterprise more to our detriment than would occur to his generals. June 29 Clear and cool-afterward hazy. Marietta, June 27th. General Braxton Bragg. The enemy advanced on our whole line to-day. They assaulted French, Cheatham, Cleburn, Stevenson, and Quarles, by whom they were repulsed. On the rest of the line the skirmishing was severe. Their loss is supposed to be great. Ours is known to be small. J. E. Johnston, General. The dispatch from Gen. Johnston gives an encouraging account of the fight in Georgia. But a dispatch from the West states that reinforcements (20,000) for Sherman's army are marching from La Grange. It is reported and believed that Gen. Early, at the head of 25,000 men, marched out of Staunton on Monday to
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
killed, 1,088 wounded, and 1,104 missing, making a total of 2,326. General Stanley had a horse shot under him, and was severely wounded. General Bradly was also wounded, but less severely. Hood reported his entire loss, in round numbers, at 4,500. General Thomas officially reported it at 1,75 killed, 3,800 wounded, and 702 prisoners, making a total of 6,252. Hood lost the following general officers: Cleburne, Williams, Adams, Gist, Strahl, and Granberry, killed; Brown, Carter, Manigault, Quarles, Cocker ell, and Scott wounded, and Gordon captured. Cleburne was called the Stonewall Jackson of the West, and his loss was severely felt. Thomas thought. it not prudent for him to risk another battle in the morning, and ordered him to retreat to Nashville. A little after midnight he left Franklin, and, notwithstanding they were sharply followed by Forrest after daybreak, the troops, with all their trains were safely within the lines at Nashville by noon on the day after the battle. Th
ce of the correctness of my assertion, this General states in his Narrative, page 352: The troops received by the Army of Tennessee during the campaign were those sent and brought to it by Lieutenant General Polk, and formed the corps of the Army which he commanded. Of these, Canty's Division of about three thousand (3000) effectives reached Resaca on the 9th of May. Loring's of five thousand (5000) on the 11th; French's of four thousand (4000) joined us at Cassville on the 18th; and Quarles's brigade of twenty-two hundred (2200) at New Hope Church on the 26th. Our Army retreated from Dalton on the night of the 12th and the morning of the 13th of May, and, as just cited, Cantry's Division of three thousand (3000) was at Resaca on the 9th, and Loring's of five thousand (5000) on the 11th. Thus, we discover fourteen thousand two hundred (14,200) infantry, and thirty-nine hundred (3900) cavalry under General Jackson, moving en route to Dalton, prior to the 9th of May; and t
: Johnston's Narrative, pages 574, 575. Infantry 37,652 40,464 Intillery 2,812 Cavalry 2,392   This was the entire strength of the Army at and near Dalton at that date. 2. The movement from Dalton began on the 12th May. On that day Loring's Division, Army of Mississippi, and Cantry's Division, joined at Resaca, with about eight thousand (8000) effectives. French's Division, same. Army, joined near Kingston several days later (about four thousand (4000) effectives). Quarles's brigade from Mobile (about twenty-two hundred (2200) effectives) joined at New Hope Church on the 26th. The cavalry of the Mississippi Army, which joined near Adairsville, was estimated at three thousand nine hundred (3900) effectives; and Martin's Cavalry Division, which joined near Resaca, at three thousand five hundred (3500). These were the only reinforcements received while General Johnston had command of the Army. 3. There was no return (filed) of the Army made after May 1st, un
hich he abandoned during the night, leaving his dead and wounded in our possession, and rapidly retreated to Nashville, closely pursued by our cavalry. We captured several stands of colors and about one thousand (1000) prisoners. Our troops fought with great gallantry. We have to lament the loss of many gallant officers and brave men. Major General Cleburne, Brigadier Generals Gist, John Adams, Strahl, and Granberry, were killed; Major General Brown, Brigadier Generals Carter, Manigault, Quarles, Cockrell, and Scott, were wounded, and Brigadier General Gordon, captured. J. B. Hood, General. I rode over the scene of action the next morning, and could but indulge in sad and painful thought, as I beheld so many brave soldiers stricken down by the enemy whom, a few hours previous, at Spring Hill, we had held within the palm of our hands. The attack which entailed so great sacrifice of life, had, for reasons already stated, become a necessity as imperative as that which impelled G
ss in killed, wounded, and prisoners was four thousand five hundred (4500). Among the killed was Major General P. R. Cleburne, Brigadier Generals Gist, John Adams, Strahl, and Granberry. Major General Brown, Brigadier Generals Carter, Manigault, Quarles, Cockrell, and Scott were wounded, and Brigadier General Gordon captured. The number of dead left by the enemy on the field indicated that his loss was equal or near our own. The next morning at daylight, the wounded being cared for and the dea with great gallantry. We have to lament the loss of many gallant officers and brave men. Major General Cleburne, Brigadier Generals Gist, John Adams, Strahl, and Granberry were killed; Major General Brown, Brigadier Generals Carter, Manigault, Quarles, Cockrell, and Scott were wounded, and Brigadier General Gordon captured. (Signed) J. B. Hood, General. our entire loss was about forty-five hundred. We continued our march towards Nashville, and on the 2d of December our Army took its pr
ng the day, I was restrained from using my artillery, on account of the women and children remaining in the town. At night, it was massed, ready to continue the action in the morning; but the enemy retired. We captured about a thousand prisoners, and several stands of colors. Our total loss, in killed, wounded, and prisoners, was 4,500. Among the killed were Maj.-Gen. P. R. Cleburne, Brig.-Gens. Gist, John Adams, Strahl, and Granbury. Maj.-Gen. Brown, with Brig.-Gens. Carter, Manigault, Quarles, Cockrell, and Scott, were wounded, and Brig.-Gen. Gordon captured. The number of dead left by the enemy on the field indicated that his loss was equal to or near our own. The next morning at daylight — the wounded being cared for and the dead buried — we moved forward toward Nashville: Forrest with his cavalry pursuing the enemy vigorously. The loss of Pat. Cleburne--the Stonewall Jackson of the West --would of itself have been a Rebel disaster. He was an Irishman by birth, who had s
mont, modified by order of the President, 2.39; of Gen. Sherman to the people of South Carolina, 240; of Gen. Burnside and Corn. Goldsborough to those of Roanoke Island, 244; of President Lincoln emancipating slaves, 253-5; of Gen. Dix, to the people of Virginia east of Chesapeake bay, 241. Proctor's creek, Ga., fight near, 634. Pryor, Brig.-Gen. Roger A., on the battle of Glendale, 563. Pulaski, siege and capture of fort, 457. Pumpkinvine creek, Ga., fight at, 628. Q. Quarles, Gen., wounded at Franklin, Tenn., 683. Queen of the West, runs the Vicksburg batteries, 298. Quinby's division, at Champion Hills, 308; at Vicksburg, 312. R. Raccoon Ford, Va., Rebels crossing at, 175. raids, of J. E. B. Stuart, around McClellan's army, 150; into Pennsylvania, 211; of Carter and Wheeler, 283; of Streight and Dodge in Georgia, 285; of Stoneman, in Virginia, 365; of Forrest and John Morgan, 270; of Grierson, 301-2; of Green, 338; of Stuart across the Rappaha
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
and also that General Grant had assumed command of the army confronting him. He added that he should probably be attacked as soon as all the expected reenforcements joined the Federal army, and therefore that he should hope for any troops I could spare from Mobile or Mississippi, but that my previous generosity forbade him to ask for any thing. In consequence of this information, two more brigades were immediately ordered to join the Army of Tennessee in front of Chattanooga. They were Quarles's and Baldwin's, the latter composed of Vicksburg troops. On the 18th the President visited the troops at Demopolis, and on the 20th those at Enterprise. While there he transferred Lieutenant-General Hardee back to the Army of Tennessee, and assigned Lieutenant-General Polk to the position he had occupied in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. With Lieutenant-General Hardee he transferred Pettus's and Moore's brigades, then at Demopolis, to General Bragg's command. All
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