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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 9 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Quarles or search for Quarles in all documents.

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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
and also that General Grant had assumed command of the army confronting him. He added that he should probably be attacked as soon as all the expected reenforcements joined the Federal army, and therefore that he should hope for any troops I could spare from Mobile or Mississippi, but that my previous generosity forbade him to ask for any thing. In consequence of this information, two more brigades were immediately ordered to join the Army of Tennessee in front of Chattanooga. They were Quarles's and Baldwin's, the latter composed of Vicksburg troops. On the 18th the President visited the troops at Demopolis, and on the 20th those at Enterprise. While there he transferred Lieutenant-General Hardee back to the Army of Tennessee, and assigned Lieutenant-General Polk to the position he had occupied in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. With Lieutenant-General Hardee he transferred Pettus's and Moore's brigades, then at Demopolis, to General Bragg's command. All
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 9 (search)
the effective condition of the army as a matter of much congratulation. And, to give a distinct idea of its strength, he asserted that the morning report exhibited an effective total that, added to the two brigades last sent from Mississippi, Quarles's and Baldwin's brigades, sent back to Mississippi by the President two weeks after. and the cavalry sent back by Longstreet, No cavalry had been sent back by Longstreet; Martin's division, referred to, rejoined us in April following. would furof forage had become regular, and the face of the country almost dry, after the review of a corps, the teams of the Napoleon guns were unable to draw them up a trifling hill, over which the road to their stables passed. On the 15th and 16th, Quarles's and Baldwin's brigades, the last two sent from Mississippi, returned to that department in obedience to orders from the Secretary of War. At the same time Governor Brown transferred two regiments of State troops to the army. They were place
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
ral infantry was engaged with Wheeler's troops, the skirmishers of Featherston's own, and Adams's brigades, and those of Quarles's brigade of Walthall's division — all in the shelter of rifle-pits. The firing was always within easy, and frequently very short range. A body of the assailants charged into Quarles's rifle-pits, where most of them were killed or captured. In the assault upon Loring's left (Cockrell's Missouri brigade) the assailants advanced rapidly from the west-their right nded was that defeated under General Bragg at Missionary Ridge, with one brigade added, Mercer's, and two taken from it, Quarles's and Baldwin's. The Federal army opposed to us was Grant's army of Missionary Ridge, then estimated at eighty thousand 9th of May; Loring's, of five thousand, on the 11th; French's, of four thousand, joined us at Cassville on the 18th; and Quarles's brigade, of twenty-two hundred, at New Hope Church on the 26th. See Major Falconer's letter of May 1, 1865, Appendix.
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memorandum for Colonel Browne, Aide-de-camp. (search)
4. The effective total of the army (infantry and artillery), thirty-six thousand one hundred and eleven. At the end of December it was thirty-six thousand eight hundred and twenty-six, which, during the month, was reduced by the transfer of Quarles's and Baldwin's brigades (twenty-seven hundred). The present brigades of the army, therefore, were increased by nineteen hundred and eighty-five effectives during January. We have a few unarmed men in each brigade. About half are without bayon May. On that day Loring's division, Army of the Mississippi, and Canty's division, joined at Resaca, with about eight thousand effectives. French's division, same army, joined near Kingston several days later (about four thousand effectives). Quarles's brigade from Mobile (about twenty-two hundred effectives) joined at New Hope Church on the 26th. The cavalry of the Mississippi Army, which joined near Adairsville, was estimated at three thousand nine hundred effectives; and Martin's cavalry