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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
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nto death, and the cavalry-man totters in the saddle for very exhaustion and sleeplessness — that is not pleasant. But then sleep is magical when he halts at last; food is ambrosial when he broils his chance slice of bacon on the end of a stick in the blaze of the camp-fire! To the cavalry-man belongs the fresh life of the forest-the wandering existence which brings back the days of old romance. Do you wish to form some conception of the life of that model cavalry-man and gentleman, Don Quixote? To do so, you have only to join the cavalry. Like the Don, your cavalryman goes through the land in search of adventures, and finds many. He penetrates retired localities-odd, unknown nooksmeeting with curious characters and out-of-the-way experiences, which would make the fortune of a romance writer. Here, far away from the rushing world and the clash of arms, he finds bright faces, and is welcomed by heaven's last best gift --for woman is ever the guardian angel of the soldier. Sh
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 7: up the Edisto. (search)
God! run all toder way! Mas'r stand in de wood, peep, peep, faid for truss [afraid to trust]. He say, Run to de wood! and ebry man run by him, straight to de boat. De brack sojer so presumptions, dey come right ashore, hold up dere head. Fus' ting I know, dere was a barn, ten tousand bushel rough rice, all in a blaze, den mas'r's great house, all cracklin‘ up de roof. Did n't I keer for see 'em blaze? Lor, mas'r, did n't care notin‘ at all, I was gwine to de boat. Dore's Don Quixote could not surpass the sublime absorption in which the gaunt old man, with arm uplifted, described this stage of affairs, till he ended in a shrewd chuckle, worthy of Sancho Panza. Then he resumed. De brack sojers so presumptions! This he repeated three times, slowly shaking his head in an ecstasy of admiration. It flashed upon me that the apparition of a black soldier must amaze those still in bondage, much as a butterfly just from the chrysalis might astound his fellow-grubs. I
ered, and it is simple absurdity to say that such a commander won the battle. If he did, Kellerman, lot Napoleon, won Marengo. Yet scarcely a battle is fought that precisely such a claim is not made in behalf of some commander, itching, perhaps, to double his stars, who may or may not have been used by the general at the decisive moment. The thing has become chronic, and he must save the day whether there is danger of losing it or not. He cannot wait for the necessity; it would be like Don Quixote awaiting an attack from the wind-mills — the affair would go by default. Therefore, as soon as the enemy approaches, he casts an eagle glance over the ground the general has carefully selected, posts his troops as if by inspiration, upon the favorable points the general has indicated, and with heroic gallantry orders his men to fire when the enemy comes up, and he has saved the day. Our special correspondent gives these facts to the people. This S. C. knows the commander; has he not e
er'sJ. T. FosterJ. & A. TirrellBoston1080 485 BarkEdward EverettJ. T. Foster'sJ. T. FosterJohn H. Pearson & Co.Boston245 486 ShipMorning StarJ. T. Foster'sJ. T. FosterT. B. Wales & Co.Boston1103 487 ShipHortensiaJ. T. Foster'sJ. T. FosterPerritt & Co.New Orleans700 488 ShipWild RangerJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisThatcher & SearsBoston1000 489 ShipEagle WingJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisTheo. ChaseBoston1200 490 ShipGeorge PeabodyJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisW. F. Weld & Co.Boston1400 491 ShipDon QuixoteS. Lapham'sS. LaphamJ. E. LodgeBoston1500 492 ShipSea FlowerJ. Stetson'sJ. StetsonB. C. WhiteBoston1061 493 ShipClimaxT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthHowes & CrowellBoston1060 494 ShipRingleaderT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthHowes & CrowellBoston1050 495 ShipWhite SwallowT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthWilliam LincolnBoston1200 496 ShipKing FisherT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthWilliam LincolnBoston1150 497 ShipEdith RoseT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthCrowell, Brooks, & Co.Boston500 498 ShipFl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
se to what has fallen from Senators who have raised themselves to eminence on this floor in championship of human wrongs. I mean the Senator from South Carolina (Mr. Butler) and the Senator from Illinois (Mr. Douglas), who, though unlike as Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, yet, like this couple, sally forth together in the same adventure. I regret much to miss the elder Senator from his seat; but the cause, against which he has run atilt with such activity of animosity, demands that the opportways profuse in words. Let her be impeached in character, or any proposition made to shut her out from the extension of her wantonness, and no extravagance of manner or hardihood of assertion is then too great for this Senator. The frenzy of Don Quixote, in behalf of his wench, Dulcinea del Toboso, is all surpassed. The asserted rights of slavery, which shock equality of all kinds, are cloaked by a fantastic claim of equality. If the slave States cannot enjoy what, in mockery of the great f
are remarkable for power rather than sweetness, and require uncommon skill in the performer to render them even moderately pleasing to a cultivated ear, unless from the force of habit or the associations connected with the instrument. De gustibus non est disputandum, — the Romans flavored their sausages with asafetida. Pipers are still attached to the Highland regiments in the British service. The antiquarian notices of the instrument are in the Musurgia of Luscinius, 1536, and in Don Quixote. Bagpipes. The Irish bagpipe was originally the same as the Scotch, but they now differ in having the mouthpiece supplied by the bellows A, which, being filled by the motion of the piper's arm, to which it is fastened, fills the bag B; whence, by the pressure of the other arm, the wind is conveyed into the chanter C, which is played on by the fingers like the common pipe. By means of a tube the wind is conveyed into drones a a a, which, being tuned at octaves to each other, produ
that the inquiry was irrelevant; but the learned justice-of-the-peace who presided held that, as it related to the witness's sanity, and that would affect his credibility, the question was admissible. It is not, perhaps, so very strange that in those days, in view of the disreputableness of those whose cause they espoused, and the apparently utter hopelessness of anything ever coming out of it, the supporters of Anti-Slaveryism should be suspected of being out of their heads. Although Don Quixote, who, according to the veracious Cervantes, set out with his unaided strong right arm to upset things, including wind-mills and obnoxious dynasties, has long been looked upon as the world's best specimen of a fanatic, he would ordinarily be set down as a very Solomon beside the man who would undertake single-handed to overthrow such an institution as American slavery used to be. Such a man there was, however. He really entered on the job of abolishing that institution, and without a sol
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 14: the minister's wooing, 1857-1859. (search)
always been achieved,--the genius that instinctively goes right to the organic elements of human nature, whether under a white skin or a black, and which disregards as trivial the conventional and factitious notions which make so large a part both of our thinking and feeling. Works of imagination written with an aim to immediate impression are commonly ephemeral, like Miss Martineau's Tales, and Elliott's Corn-law Rhymes; but the creative faculty of Mrs. Stowe, like that of Cervantes in Don Quixote and of Fielding in Joseph Andrews, overpowered the narrow specialty of her design, and expanded a local and temporary theme with the cosmopolitanism of genius. It is a proverb that There is a great deal of human nature in men, but it is equally and sadly true that there is amazingly little of it in books. Fielding is the only English novelist who deals with life in its broadest sense. Thackeray, his disciple and congener, and Dickens, the congener of Smollett, do not so much treat
gents of this power he had more than general reasons to speak severely. Among them were Mr. Butler and Mr. Douglas, who had singled him out for special attack. In this speech, therefore, he took occasion to repay them for their assaults, and proposed to say something in reference to what has fallen from Senators who have raised themselves to eminence on this floor in championship of human wrongs. I mean the Senator from South Carolina and the Senator from Illinois, who though unlike as Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, yet, like this couple, sally forth in the same adventure. Of the former he spoke as one applying opprobrious epithets to those who differ from him on this floor, calling them sectional and fanatical, and their opposition to the usurpations in Kansas an uncalculating fanaticism! Of the latter he said: The Senator dreams that he can subdue the North. He disclaims the open threat; but his conduct implies it. How little that Senator knows himself, or the strength of the
gents of this power he had more than general reasons to speak severely. Among them were Mr. Butler and Mr. Douglas, who had singled him out for special attack. In this speech, therefore, he took occasion to repay them for their assaults, and proposed to say something in reference to what has fallen from Senators who have raised themselves to eminence on this floor in championship of human wrongs. I mean the Senator from South Carolina and the Senator from Illinois, who though unlike as Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, yet, like this couple, sally forth in the same adventure. Of the former he spoke as one applying opprobrious epithets to those who differ from him on this floor, calling them sectional and fanatical, and their opposition to the usurpations in Kansas an uncalculating fanaticism! Of the latter he said: The Senator dreams that he can subdue the North. He disclaims the open threat; but his conduct implies it. How little that Senator knows himself, or the strength of the
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