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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 28 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 12 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 28, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Radcliffe or search for Radcliffe in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 3 document sections:

Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Life at Radcliffe. (search)
tudents. Again, to girls from New England the atmosphere of thought and study which invests Radcliffe is too familiar to be worth comment, whereas to the Southern or Western girls it is one of the very level-headed, her work will soon drive her into becoming what is popularly denominated a Radcliffe grind. It is a curious fact, by the way, that no girl is proud of being called a grind. No College was the Idler which has for its object amusement pure and simple. Few persons except Radcliffe students realize the large part which this club plays in the social life of the college. Its e clubs, the social element is represented by the Graduate Club, one of the most hospitable of Radcliffe organizations, and also by the teas which Mrs. Agassiz gives to the students on Wednesday aftellu the African explorer, and Prof. Charles Eliot Norton. Beside these occasional lectures, Radcliffe students have always the privilege of personal intercourse with the best and wisest of the Har
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Student life at Radcliffe. (search)
er spheres of usefulness than they otherwise could fill adequately. To me, Radcliffe life seems to have had as its essential quality, freedom. This freedom is githem the qualities that are desirable, those who have watched the progress of Radcliffe students through four years of college life are best able to judge. Since, Agassiz, our president, and where, I am glad to say, during the past winter, Radcliffe students have been able to find, many hours during the day, Miss Agnes Irwin,e lover of restful quiet, I might wish to show her, at once, the contrasts of Radcliffe life, contrasts such as those of a certain February day of ‘93. On that day Wednesdays our president or our dean, and oft-times some of the associates of Radcliffe, are at home, and groups of students are made most welcome with friendly greename announces, is purely social in its purpose, yet to the Idler, I am sure, Radcliffe owes a certain characteristic of unity which the large rival societies of som
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), The home of Radcliffe College. (search)
ce a picture of the late Professor Josiah P. Cooke, a gift from Mrs. Cooke who, with her husband, has always been deeply interested in the growth and progress of Radcliffe. The offices are found at either side of the main entrance, and the regent and secretary are accommodated in rooms well adapted to their uses, with their fire roof where the girls who are inclined toward astronomy mayor make their observations. As we pass out we realize that we have seen nothing of the real life of Radcliffe, but if environment counts for anything the student here must be uplifted daily and refined by her surroundings. Radcliffe is fast outgrowing its present home. een nothing of the real life of Radcliffe, but if environment counts for anything the student here must be uplifted daily and refined by her surroundings. Radcliffe is fast outgrowing its present home. When the new one appears may it be as cheery and homelike as this, so dear to the hearts of its many students, past and present.