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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 6 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 4 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 14, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Ancestry-birth-boyhood (search)
as a Republican and brave soldier during the rebellion. Chilton is reported as having told of an earlier horse-trade of mine. As he told the story, there was a Mr. Ralston living within a few miles of the village, who owned a colt which I very much wanted. My father had offered twenty dollars for it, but Ralston wanted twenty-fiRalston wanted twenty-five. I was so anxious to have the colt, that after the owner left, I begged to be allowed to take him at the price demanded. My father yielded, but said twenty dollars was all the horse was worth, and told me to offer that price; if it was not accepted I was to offer twenty-two and a half, and if that would not get him, to give the twenty-five. I at once mounted a horse and went for the colt. When I got to Mr. Ralston's house, I said to him: Papa says I may offer you twenty dollars for the colt, but if you won't take that, I am to offer twenty-two and a half, and if you won't take that, to give you twenty-five. It would not require a Connecticut man to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 6.79 (search)
ere quickly built, equipped, turned over to the navy, and sent to Berwick Bay, under Commander T. McKean Buchanan. When all was ready Weitzel took transports, under convoy, landed below Donaldsonville, entered the town, and on the 27th of October moved on Thibodeaux, the heart of the district. At Georgia Landing, two miles above Labadieville, he encountered the Confederates under Brigadier-General Alfred Mouton, consisting of the 18th and 33d Louisiana, Crescent and Terre Bonne regiments, Ralston's and Semmes's batteries, and 2d Louisiana Cavalry,--in all reported by Mouton as 1392 strong; they had taken up a defensive position on both sides of the bayou. After a short but spirited engagement, Mouton's force was routed and pursued about four miles. Mouton then called in his other troops, burned the bridges, and evacuated the district, Buchanan's gun-boats having been prevented by a gale from arriving in time to cut off the retreat. Mouton's report accounts for 5 killed, 8 wounded,
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, III. (search)
e is the single prophetic incident. It has been told in many ways; and his own is the best, as usual:-- There was a Mr. Ralston . . . who owned a colt which I very much wanted. My father had offered twenty dollars for it, but Ralston wanted tweRalston wanted twenty-five. I was so anxious to have the colt that . . . my father yielded, but said twenty dollars was all the horse was worth, and told me to offer that price. If it was not accepted, I was to offer twenty-two and a half, and, if that would not get him, to give the twenty-five. I at once mounted a horse, and went for the colt. When I got to Mr. Ralston's house, I said to him, Papa says I may offer you twenty dollars for the colt, but, if you won't take that, I am to offer twenty-two and a to his memoirs. Yes, that old horse story is an omen. It raises laughter, to be sure; but change the figure of farmer Ralston, getting his undue price through the boy's guilelessness, into Belknap of the Fort Sill and national cemetery scandals,
to exclaim: What a wholesome bringing up it was! I must find room for one story of Grant's boyhood, a story which he tells against himself :-- There was a Mr. Ralston living within a few miles of the village, who owned a colt that I very much wanted. My father had offered twenty dollars for it, but Ralston wanted twenty-fivRalston wanted twenty-five. I was so anxious to have the colt, that, after the owner left, I begged to be allowed to take him at the price demanded. My father yielded, but said twenty dollars was all the horse was worth, and told me to offer that price; if it was not accepted, I might offer twenty-two and a half, and if that would not get him, might give the twenty-five. I at once mounted a horse and went for the colt. When I got to Mr. Ralston's house, I said to him: Papa says I may offer you twenty dollars for the colt, but if you won't take that, I am to offer twenty-two and a half, and if you won't take that, to give you twenty-five. It would not require a Connecticut man t
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 5: California, New York, and Kansas. 1857-1859. (search)
ad carried the ledger and books to St. Louis, but left a schedule, notes, etc., in the hands of S. M. Bowman, Esq., who passed them over to me. On the 30th of January I published a notice of the dissolution of the partnership, and called on all who were still indebted to the firm of Lucas, Turner & Co. to pay up, or the notes would be sold at auction. I also advertised that all the real property was for sale. Business had somewhat changed since 1857. Parrott & Co.; Garrison, Fritz & Ralston; Wells, Fargo & Co.; Drexel, Sather & Church, and Tallant & Wilde, were the principal bankers. Property continued almost unsalable, and prices were less than a half of what they had been in 1853-954. William Blanding, Esq., had rented my house on Harrison Street; so I occupied a room in the bank, No. 11, and boarded at the Meiggs House, corner of Broadway and Montgomery, which we owned. Having reduced expenses to a minimum, I proceeded, with all possible dispatch, to collect outstanding
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the artillery of the army of Western Louisiana, after the battle of Pleasant Hill. (search)
e artillery of the army of Western Louisiana, after the battle of Pleasant Hill. Report of Colonel J. L. Brent. head quarters of artillery, Dist. West Louisiana, in the field, May 20th, 1864. Major E. Surget, Assistant Adjutant General: Major,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the artillery of this army, since the battle of Pleasant Hill. On the 10th and 13th of April, on the north bank of Red river, Lieutenant Coleman, commanding section of Ralston's battery, and Lieutenant T. Jeff. Key, commanding section of Cameron's battery, engaged the enemy's transports and gunboats, firing the aggregate number of 105 rounds of ammunition. The steam pipe of a gunboat was cut and a transport and gunboat were reported as badly crippled. These two sections were under the immediate command of Captain Fauntleroy, Chief of Artillery of General Liddell's command. On the 12th of April, the Howitzer section of Captain J. A. A. West's Horse Artiller
a toothed or corrugated wheel or segment, turning within an outer eccentric casing in such manner as to be rolled by the contact of the two, being squeezed between the gradually narrowing space between the surfaces of the wheel and the case. Ralston's rotary squeezer. In Ralston's Rotary squeezer the ball of metal is inserted at a, and is carried around in the direction shown by the arrow by the ridged roller b, which, rotating in that direction, compresses it between itself and the ridRalston's Rotary squeezer the ball of metal is inserted at a, and is carried around in the direction shown by the arrow by the ridged roller b, which, rotating in that direction, compresses it between itself and the ridged eccentric casing c as the sectional area of the space between the two diminishes; expressing the cinder and delivering the ball at the opening d. Saurian squeezer. The Saurian squeezer is so called from its similarity to the jaws of a saurian, — a crocodile, for instance. The upper jaw b is moved by a crank a on a pivot, in the manner of the movable jaw of a pair of heavy shears. The palace and lower jaw are corrugated. Its office is to compact and shape the ball c of puddled iron,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
riend in America, dated June 24, 1819: The American character has been much raised among our literary people here, by a constellation of persons of brilliant talents and polished manners, by whom we were dazzled and delighted last winter. A Mr. Preston of Virginia [South Carolina] and his friend from Carolina, whose name I cannot spell, for it is French [Hugh S. Legare], Mr. Ticknor, and Mr. Cogswell were the most distinguished representatives of your new world. A handsome and high-bred Mr. Ralston, from Philadelphia, whose mind seemed equal to his other attractions, left also a very favorable impression of transatlantic accomplishments. These were all very agreeable persons, Mr. Ticknor pre-eminently so, and I can assure you ample justice was done to their merits here.—Memoirs of Mrs. Anne Grant, of Laggan. . . . . . Not a great deal of society came to her house, and what there was did not much interest me. I met there Owen of Lanark, who talked me out of all patience with his loc
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
Washington with G. T., 380, 381; letters to, 386, 479. Preston, W. C., of South Carolina, 278 note, 298. Prevost, Professor, 155. Prichard, Dr., 422. Primary Schools of Boston, 2 and note. Prossedi, Princess, 182, 194 note. Provencal studies, 252. Prussia, Frederic William III., King of, 502. Putland, Mr. and Mrs., 425. Q Quebec, visits, 386. Quetelet, M., 450. Quincy, lion. Josiah, 339, 345, 368. Quincy, Mrs. J., 345. R Raczynski, Count, 495, 501. Ralston, Mr., 278 note. Rancliffe, Baroness, 458, 459. Randall, Miss, 312 and note. Randohr, 175. Randolph, Colonel, 35. Randolph, John, of Roanoke, 15, 16, 27, 381. Randolph, Mrs., 35, 348. Randolph, T. J. and Ellen, 35, 37, 348. Rauch, Christian, 495. Recamier, Mad., 137, 304. Recke, Frau von der, 474. Rees, Dr., 55. Regina, Duke de, 446. Reichenbach, H. T. L., 475, 482. Reid, Mrs., 415 and note. Retzsch, Moritz, 466, 474, 476, 484, 490. Reynolds, Dr., Edward, 154. Ric
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
f, II. 330, 331, 332, 333, 340, 341. Prussia, Prince of, II. 331 and note. Puibusque, A. de, II. 288, 355. Purgstall, Baroness, 11. 8. Putland, Mr. and Mrs., I. 425. Q Quarantine near Bologna, II. 46, 47. Quebec, visits, I. 386. Quetelet, M., I. 450. Quincy, lion. Josiah, I. 339, 345, 368. Quincy, Mrs. J., I. 345. Quinet, Edgar, II. 101, 127. R Raczynski, Count, I. 495, 501, II. 330. Radetzky, Marshal, II 336, 338. Radnor, Lord and Lady, 11. 178. Ralston, Mr., I. 278 note. Ramirez, II 41. Ramsay, Mrs. E, II 164. Ramsay, Rev. Edward (Dean), II. 164 and note. Rancliffe, Baroness, I. 458, 459. Randall, Miss, I. 312 and note, II. 104. Randohr, I. 175. Randolph, Colonel, I. 35. Randolph, John, of Roanoke, I. 15, 16, 27, 381. Randolph, Mrs., I. 35, 348. Randolph, T. J. and Ellen, I. 35, 37, 348. Ranke, Professor, II. 332. Rauch, Christian, I. 495, II. 341, 412 and note. Rauzan, Due de, II. 128. Rauzan, Duchesse de
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