Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Ramseur or search for Ramseur in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
ough, for one year, at $25.00 per month, Charles is a good cook and forager. At night I attended a Grand Ball at Dr. Terrell's, to which I contributed $25.00. Gen. Ramseur and his bride, nee Miss Richmond, of N. C., were present. Pretty women and officers in gay Confederate gray uniforms, were a lovely sight to look upon. Mrs. and had several men killed. Captain Carter's battery can't be excelled. Sept. 15 and 16. Am officer of the guard. Rodes' Division, composed of Daniel's and Ramseur's North Carolina brigades, Doles' Georgia, and Battle's Alabama brigades, were marched out to witness a melancholy sight, the public shooting of one of Ramseur's Ramseur's brigade, who was convicted of desertion by a court martial and sentenced to be shot to death by musketry. It was a sad sight, but his death was necessary as a warning and lesson to his comrades. Each regiment was marched in front of the dead body, and his breast was pierced by several balls. On return to camp we found two of my
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Henry Chase Whiting, Major-General C. S. Army. (search)
ou, as a prisoner of war, of the taking of Fort Fisher on the night of the 15th instant, after an assault of unprecedented fury, both by sea and land, lasting from Friday morning until Sunday night. On Thursday night, the enemy's fleet was reported off the fort. On Friday morning, the fleet opened very heavily. On Friday and Saturday, during the furious bombardment on the fort, the enemy was allowed to land, without molestation, and to throw up a light line of field works from Battery Ramseur to the river, thus securing his position from molestation, and making the fate of Fort Fisher, under the circumstances, but a question of time. On Sunday, the fire on the fort reached a pitch of fury to which no language can do justice. It was concentrated on the land face and front. In a short time, nearly every gun was dismounted or disabled, and the garrison suffered severely by the fire. At 3 o'clock the enemy's land force, which had been gradually and slowly advancing, formed int
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
don Times on, 293; Lines on, 299; Recollections of, 306. Pensioning of the Confederate Soldiers by the U. S. Government, Protest against, 313, 322. Pettigrew, General J. J., wounded, 144. Peyton, Major T. G., 242. Pickens, Colonel S. B., 2. Porter, General, Fitz John, 135, 250. Port Royal, Battle of. 233. Presbyterian Church, Richmond, The Second, 259. Preston, General John S., 244. Proskauer, Major, 21. Pryor, Colonel Roger A , 108. Rains, Colonel G J., 370. Ramseur, General S. D., and bride, 4, Randolph, General G. W., 243. Randolph, John, 350. Raoul, Miss C. T., fired the gun proclaiming the secession of Alabama, 212. Reeve, Captain, E. Payson, 111. Reilly, Major, James, 161. Richmond, Va., Fall of, 375; hotels in 1863, 3. Rodes, General R. E., Commendation of Alabama troops, 31. Roosevelt, Hon., Theo., 342. Rosser, Rev. Dr. Leo., 18. Rowe, Colonel, Residence of, 25. Ruffin, Edmund, at Fort Sumter, 107. Russell, Lord, John, 332.