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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
the General left for dead upon the field. This was the beginning of the end. The eleventh corps soon gave way and beat a hasty retreat into and through the town, Ramseur, Daniel and Gordon in pursuit. Pender was meanwhile, hotly engaged, and confronted with the same obstinate resistance and valor, which earlier in the day had wefore that was effected night had come on. The official reports of the brigade commanders of the second corps show that several of the brigades, notably Hays' and Ramseur's, ,were almost intact, and equal to any further calls which might be made on them. General Early seems to have had a better perception of the situation, and as they were used before Pickett's charge on the third day. General Pendleton, chief of artillery of the army, says the proposition did occur to him, but on General Ramseur's suggestion that it would draw fire upon his troops in the town, it was allowed to drop. The suggestion was an untimely and ill-judged as its acceptance was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incident of the battle of Winchester, or Opequon. (search)
s he would have thrown his cavalry corps on Early's right across the Valley Pike and pressed his battle in that direction. Had he done so and sustained his assault with sturdiness, it looks as if he ought to have captured all of Early's army. On the contrary, he felt his way forward with extreme caution, and up to 4 o'clock in the afternoon, notwithstanding his overwhelming force, he was checked and beaten by Early in the battle, which for sturdy valor has no superior in the whole war. Ramseur, on our right, held his own against Sheridan's assault most gallantly. Rodes came in and drove the enemy's front, a splendid achievement. The battle trembled in the balance, as Colonel Thomas H. Carter says, and the artillery, of which he was the chief, rolled back in disaster and dismay the assaults made upon it. The turn of the battle came about the time the Eighth Corps and Torbet's whole corps of cavalry, with the exception of Wilson's division (which had been thrown to our right and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle at Bethesda Church. (search)
ook the flag, so soon to be his winding sheet, and the brigade was marched out and down the road, the Forty-ninth at its head, for some distance, and halted, General Ramseur bossing the job. I then heard a single piece of artillery firing at intervals in a strip of woods on the left, and being at the head of the column I heard General Ramseur say to General Early: General, let me take that gun out of the wet. General Early vigorously advised and protested against it. Ramseur insisting, General Early finally acquiesced in the move. The brigade was fronted to the left and the advance started. The gun immediately retired to the works as a decoy and no Ramseur insisting, General Early finally acquiesced in the move. The brigade was fronted to the left and the advance started. The gun immediately retired to the works as a decoy and no resistance was made to our advance then. Presently we came to a level, open field, one-half mile across, and could see on the opposite side at the edge of another strip of timber behind which artillery was massed—heavier than I had ever seen, unless it was at Malvern Hill, although I had been in every battle of the war, from First