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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 95 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 78 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 21 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for S. D. Ramseur or search for S. D. Ramseur in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
Mathews. Sixtieth Georgia, Colonel W. H. Stiles. Sixty-first Georgia, Colonel J. H. Lamar. Pegrarm's brigade. in Ramseur's division. Brigadier-General John Pegram. Thirteenth Virginia, Colonel J. E. B. Terrill. Thirty-first Virginia, CoVirginia, Colonel James H. Skinner. Fifty-eighth Virginia, Colonel F. H. Board. Hoke's brigade. Godwin's brigade, Ramseur's division. Sixth North Carolina, Colonel R. F. Webb. Twenty-first North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel W. S. Rankin. H. Boyd. Fifty-third North Carolina, Colonel Wm. A. Owens. Second North Carolina Battalion, Major John M. Hancock. Ramseur's brigade. with North Carolina regiments from Steuart's brigade was Cox's brigade. Second North Carolina, Colonel labama, Colonel S. B. Pickens. Sixty-first Alabama, Major [Lieutenant-Colonel] L. H. Hill. Johnston's brigade. in Ramseur's division. Fifth North Carolina, Colonel T. M. Garrett. Twelfth North Carolina, Colonel H. E. Coleman. Twentieth N
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 73 (search)
Twenty-first Virginia. Twenty-fifth Virginia. Forty-second Virginia. Forty-fourth Virginia. Forty-eighth Virginia. Fiftieth Virginia. Lieutenant-Colonel S. H. Saunders. Tenth Virginia. Twenty-third Virginia. Thirty-seventh Virginia. Ramseur's division. regimental commanders not indicated on inspection report. Major General S. D. Ramseur. Pegram's brigade. Brigadier-General John Pegram. Thirteenth Virginia. Thirty-first Virginia. Forty-ninth Virginia. Fifty-second ViMajor General S. D. Ramseur. Pegram's brigade. Brigadier-General John Pegram. Thirteenth Virginia. Thirty-first Virginia. Forty-ninth Virginia. Fifty-second Virginia. Fifty-eighth Virginia. Johnston's brigade. Brigadier-General R. D. Johnston. Fifth North Carolina. Twelfth North Carolina. Twentieth North Carolina. Twenty-third North Carolina. Godwin's brigade. Brigadier-General A. C. Godwin. Sixth North Carolina. Twenty-first North Carolina. Fifty-fourth North Carolina. Fifty-seventh North Carolina. First North Carolina Battalion.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Artillery at the Southern arsenals. (search)
did not mean to be understood quite literally, when he wrote: There were no batteries of serviceable field artillery at any of the Southern arsenals. At the Fayetteville, N. C., arsenal, there was a fine battery of brass field pieces—four six-pounder guns, and two twelve-pounder howitzers, with forge and battery wagon complete. When the arsenal was surrendered to the State forces, this battery was turned over to the Ellis Light Artillery Company, of Raleigh, first commanded by Captain S. D. Ramseur, who, as Major-General commanding division, was killed at Cedar Creek, in the Valley, in October, 1864. The battery first saw service near Norfolk and on the Peninsula, and was subsequently known as Manly's Battery (Captain B. C. Manly), of Cabell's Battalion, Army of Northern Virginia. In time the company no doubt fell heir to twelve-pounder Napoleons, or to rifled pieces, but guns of that kind were not much known in the early days of 1861, and a company provided with a complete
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
that our cavalry were in the fort dismounted that Sheridan could not get at us? Is not this a singular fact? General Early says that Wickham's brigade covered Ramseur's division, the only organized command in his infantry; yet in that manoeuvre Ramseur had held in check Wilson's division, and my little brigade was the only forcRamseur had held in check Wilson's division, and my little brigade was the only force between Ramseur and Averill and Torbert; thus their three divisions of 11,000 cavalry: indeed more mounted men by double than Early had organized in the field, and yet they let us get away. They did not even press us. Let the military student take Pond's book and maps and see the battle-field and compare it with Early's narrativRamseur and Averill and Torbert; thus their three divisions of 11,000 cavalry: indeed more mounted men by double than Early had organized in the field, and yet they let us get away. They did not even press us. Let the military student take Pond's book and maps and see the battle-field and compare it with Early's narrative, and decide this matter in his own mind. Retreat up the Luray Valley. That night General Wickham sent my Brigade, that is the First, Second and Fourth Regiments (he retained the Third Virginia and the Battery) to Front Royal, to picket and guard the approaches from Winchester, so as to cover the Luray Valley road. I moved