hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 8 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
ant space in front of the mansion of a Mr. Spurlock. There we parked our guns, took out the horses, and—all lay down on the ground to rest. I don't think I had slept long when I was aroused by Mr. Spurlock—think that was his name—who insisted that we should go over to his residence and take dinner. We thanked him, and insisted that we had had something to eat, but he would not take such an excuse. The truth is we were too dirty and ragged to feel at home in such a nice place. Finally Clay Ramsey consented to go with me, and we went over. The old gentleman enquired our names and introduced us to his daughters, very beautiful young ladies, who entertained us by singing and playing on the piano until dinner was announced. Then we escorted the young ladies down to the dining-room, and such a dinner we had not seen before in years. We tried to do our duty towards that dinner, and particularly to the turkey; anyhow, we ate with a relish. Captain Ferrell camped in another part of <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
in the harbor, waiting with officers and munitions of war, she having arrived two days before from Liverpool. The Laurel was a blockade runner, commanded by Captain Ramsey, a young Englishman of energy and resources. Capt. Ramsey's brilliant Ruse. When the authorities at Funchal objected to our presence in the harbor, and Capt. Ramsey's brilliant Ruse. When the authorities at Funchal objected to our presence in the harbor, and seriously and persistently insisted that the Laurel should proceed at once to sea, Ramsey was ready with a broken piece of machinery, without which he insisted that his engines could not be made to move. The delicate and tedious work of repair was entrusted by the authorities to their own workmen on shore, so anxious were they toRamsey was ready with a broken piece of machinery, without which he insisted that his engines could not be made to move. The delicate and tedious work of repair was entrusted by the authorities to their own workmen on shore, so anxious were they to get rid of us. While they were still hammering away the Sea King arrived and signalled, and the Laurel steamed out to join her. Not far from Madeira, and of the same group, is the Desertas, and under the lee of that uninhabited rock both vessels anchored, and all guns, supplies, etc., were transferred from the Laurel to the Se