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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for James Ryder Randall or search for James Ryder Randall in all documents.

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ollections, such as the Touch the Elbow Songster, with three grim-looking volunteers James Ryder Randall the author of My Maryland, at twenty-two In 1861, just as he looked when he wrote his famous battle-cry, My Maryland, James Ryder Randall, the youthful poet, faces the reader. Randall was born in Baltimore the first day of 1839. His early schooling was under Joseph H. Clark, a formeRandall was born in Baltimore the first day of 1839. His early schooling was under Joseph H. Clark, a former teacher of Edgar Allan Poe. At Georgetown College he was the smallest boy that had ever been received as a student. After becoming known as the poet of the college, he traveled extensively in the earliest poem of the conflict deserves to be treasured as one of its proudest memories. James Ryder Randall's fervid call of Maryland, my Maryland will live, by reason of its martial ring and splenBattle hymn of the Republic, whose swinging, deep-toned measures form a significant contrast to Randall's high-pitched lyric. The two poems are, indeed, typical of the two sections. One surges forw
Chapter 3: in Memoriam The ruined bridge at Bull Run on the heights above, young Pelham, hero of Randall's poem following, won his first laurels Pelham Just as the spring came laughing through the strife, With all its gorgeous cheer, In the bright April of historic life Fell the great cannoneer. The wondrous lullinthat beauteous face, While, round the lips and eyes, Couched in their marble slumber, flashed the grace Of a divine surprise. Pelham, ‘the great cannoneer’ Randall's poem was such a tribute as few young soldiers have ever received, and this is true also of General ‘Jeb’ Stuart's order of March 20, 1863, after Pelham's death:ern dead. How must he smile on this dull world beneath, Fevered with swift renown; He, with the martyr's amaranthine wreath, Twining the victor's crown! James Ryder Randall. Ashby Turner Ashby of Virginia (1824-1862) distinguished himself as a leader of cavalry under Stonewall Jackson. The English military writer, Co
This famous Confederate lyric had a striking origin. While James Ryder Randall was teaching in Poydras College he became acquainted with Mrthe young Professor a copy of the poems of James Clarence Mangan. Randall was warm in his admiration of the gifted Irish poet, and especiall first citizen to fall was a friend and College mate of the poet. Randall's own account of the effect of this news appears in a letter printpularity of the lyric I had been so strangely stimulated to write. Randall was always free to acknowledge that Mangan's poem solved the meteron April 26th. Nearly every Southern journal at once copied it. Mr. Randall says: I did not concern myself much about it, but very soon, froand entertained the same kindly feelings for the ‘despots’ of whom Randall sang. Many another young lady, like the one sitting in her crinolurns! she'll come! she'll come! Maryland, my Maryland! James Ryder Randall. Advance the flag of Dixie: a hopeful Confederate group o