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commenced, and the ordinary routine began. Ii. There is a French proverb which declares that although you may know when you set out on a journey, you do not know when you will arrive. Those who journey through the fine land of memory are, of all travellers, the most ignorant upon that score, and are apt to become the most unconscionable vagarists. Memory refuses to recall one scene or incident without recalling also a hundred others which preceded or followed it. You people, said John Randolph to a gentleman of an extensive clan, with which the eccentric orator was always at war, you people all take up each other's quarrels. You are worse than a pile of fishhooks. If I try to grasp one, I raise the whole bunch. To end my preface, and come to my little incident. I was sitting on my horse near General Stuart, who had put in the skirmishers, and was now superintending the fire of his artillery, when a cavalry-man rode up and reported that they had just captured a deserter.
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 1: ancestry. (search)
d him home; or he might also have been the author of the Declaration of American Independence in place of Thomas Jefferson. His services to the cause of the colony were great, and their struggle for independence was sustained by his tongue and pen. He was a great orator, an accomplished scholar, a learned debater, and a renowned statesman in that period of our country's history. His father's brother, Henry Lee, the fifth son of the second Richard, married a Miss Bland, a great-aunt of John Randolph, of Roanoke. His only daughter married a Fitzhugh. His son Henry married Miss Grymes, and left a family of six sons and four daughters. Henry, the eldest, was the well-known Light-horse Harry of the Revolutionary War, the father of Robert E. Lee. He and Richard Henry Lee are frequently confounded, and their relationship has often been the subject of inquiry. Richard Henry Lee's father, Thomas, and Henry Lee's grandfather, Henry, were brothers. The former was therefore a first cousi
Chapter 12: Christian Fellowship candid conversation with a slaveholder Clay-eaters a true Unionist secret Organizations in the South Washington and Randolph on slavery Aunt Katy religion and republicanism proslavery Inexcusable in the North a distinguished Abolitionist. As the words of inspiration came to my ears, I, too, sank on my knees, and poured forth my soul at the mercy-seat. I must have spoken rather loudly, for the next morning, this identical slave woman, wof slavery, which neither Maryland nor Virginia has at present; but there is nothing more certain than that they must have, and at a period not remote. The sheriffs statement regarding the liberation of his slaves, was the same as that of John Randolph, Governor of Virginia. The latter said: The deplorable error, of our ancestors in copying a civil institution from savage Africa, has affixed to their posterity, a depressing burden, which nothing but the extraordinary benefits confe
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
-55, 257-58, 291 Texas Infantry: 1st Regiment, 254-55. Thompson, Charles A., 197 Three months in the southern states, 246 Toombs, Robert Augustus, 26 Troup Artillery (Ga.), 154, 170-71, 251, 259 Tucker, Ben F., 224-27. Tucker, John Randolph (1812-1883), 311, 329 Tucker, John Randolph (1823-1897), 40 Twichell, Joseph Hopkins, 34 Tyndall, John, 351 Tyndall, Louisa Hamilton, 351 Uniforms, 70, 82, 84-85, 120-21, 195, 230, 242-43, 297, 312, 333, 356-57. United StatesJohn Randolph (1823-1897), 40 Twichell, Joseph Hopkins, 34 Tyndall, John, 351 Tyndall, Louisa Hamilton, 351 Uniforms, 70, 82, 84-85, 120-21, 195, 230, 242-43, 297, 312, 333, 356-57. United States Congress, 25-32, 62 United States Marines, 26 United States Military Academy, 65, 110-11, 121 University of Virginia, 50-51, 91, 145, 277, 356 Vallandigham, Clement Laird, 26, 28-30. Vicars, Hedley Shafto Johnstone, 230, 367 Venable, Charles Scott, 51, 277 Virginia Central Railroad, 120, 231 189, 308 Sherman, John, 26-28. Sherman, William Tecumseh, 300, 317, 348 Sims, John, 292 Sims, Robert Gill, 292 Shields, John Camden, 67 Sickles, Daniel Edgar, 219 Sickness, 64-65,
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 83: General Ransom's reminiscences of Mr. Davis. (search)
faculties of observation, naturally very fine, were highly cultivated. He was an excellent swordsman. His success as a planter showed his practical capacity in ordinary matters. He was fond of domestic animals, and few men were better judges of all classes of them. He believed in the thorough-bred in a horse, though I do not know that he ever raised them to any extent. With the forest trees of the various regions of our country he was well acquainted, and was, perhaps, the equal of John Randolph as a geographer of his own country. Mr. Davis had not only read of the arts and sciences, of trades and commerce, and all that pertains to them, but was so conversant with such subjects that he was at home among experts in all branches. He must have been for the greater part of his life a hard student, and I think contracted the habit of burning midnight oil, for he was a late riser. His memory was nearly infallible. A person whom he had met casually he could call by name years afte
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 1: the political Conventions in 1860. (search)
ause of the prevalence of this dangerous and unpatriotic sentiment in his native State, which was spreading in the Slave-labor States, that Washington gave to his countrymen that magnificent plea for Union--his Farewell Address. According to John Randolph of Roanoke, the Grand Arsenal of Richmond, Virginia, was built with an eye to putting down the Administration of Mr. Adams (the immediate successor of Washington in the office of President) with the bayonet, if it could not be accomplished by other means. --Speech of Randolph in the Iouse of Representatives, January, 1817. and, under the culture of disloyal and ambitious men, after gradual development and long ripening, assumed the form and substance of a rebellion of a few arrogant land and slave holders against popular government. It was the rebellion of an Oligarchy against the people, with whom the sovereign power is rightfully lodged. We will not here discuss the subject of the remote and half-hidden springs of the rebellio
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 3: assembling of Congress.--the President's Message. (search)
for the last quarter of a century. This agitation, he alleged, had inspired the slaves with vague notions of freedom, and hence a sense of security no longer exists around the family altar. Then, with substantial repetition of the words of John Randolph on the floor of Congress, fifty years before, I speak from facts, said Randolph, in 1811, when I say that the night-bell never tolls for fire in Richmond, that the frightened mother does not hug her infant the more closely to her bosom, noRandolph, in 1811, when I say that the night-bell never tolls for fire in Richmond, that the frightened mother does not hug her infant the more closely to her bosom, not knowing what may have happened. I have myself witnessed some of the alarms in the capital of Virginia. This was a quarter of a century before there was any violent agitation of the Slavery question throughout the North. he said:--This feeling of peace at home has given place to apprehensions of servile insurrection. Many a matron throughout the South retires at night in dread of what may befall herself and her children before the morning. George Fitzhugh, in the article in De Bow's Rev
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 21: beginning of the War in Southeastern Virginia. (search)
lling Newce, and that the name given is a compound of the name of the celebrated navigator and the Virginia marshal, namely, Newport-Newce. This compounding of words in naming places was then common in England, and became so in this country, as Randolph-Macon, Hampton-Sidney, and Wilkes-Barre. In Captain Smith's map of Virginia, the place is called Point Hope. That map was made after the alleged discovery of Newport with his-supplies. Believing that the name was originally a compound of thosood, toward the left flank of the insurgents, with three companies of Massachusetts and Vermont troops of Washburne's command. The battle was opened by a Parrott rifled cannon fired from the insurgent battery to the right of the bridge, by Major Randolph, commander of the Richmond Howitzer Battalion. This was answered by cheers from the Union troops, who steadily advanced in the face of a heavy fire, intending to dash across the stream and storm the works. Most of the shot passed over their
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Mr. Mason's manners. (search)
mbassadors extraordinary have a manual of as much authority as that of General Scott is with infantry? Why should they not be taught to go through their paces, their genuflexions, their advances and their retreats? How must we have suffered in the estimation of polite Europe for the want of such a work, to the compilation of which we do respect-fully entreat Mr. Peter Parley to devote his declining years! Might not such a volume, however elementary in,, its inculcations, have shown to John Randolph, of Roanoke, (clarum et venerable nomen!) the impropriety of approaching in a pair of buckskin breeches the enthroned Majesty of Muscovy? or of falling before Royalty upon his knees? For performing these two feats, the Lord of Roanoke drew eighteen thousand dollars from the treasury of his country, and did that country no conceivable service whatever. Might not a little previous study have saved Minister Hannegan from devoting himself more to Bacchus than to Vatel, Puffendorf and Whea
sion of the sixth article of the Ordinance of ‘87, whereby Slavery was expressly prohibited. Their memorial was referred by the House of Representatives to a Select Committee of three, two of them from the Slave States, with the since famous John Randolph of Roanoke, then a young member, as its chairman. On the 2d of March, 1803, Mr. Randolph made a unanimous report from this Committee, recommending a denial of the prayer of the petitioners, for these reasons: The rapid population of the Mr. Randolph made a unanimous report from this Committee, recommending a denial of the prayer of the petitioners, for these reasons: The rapid population of the State of Ohio sufficiently evinces, in the opinion of your Committee, that the labor of slaves is not necessary to promote the growth and settlement of colonies in that region; that this labor — demonstrably the dearest of any — can only be employed in the cultivation of products more valuable than any known to that quarter of the United States; that the Committee deem it highly dangerous and inexpedient to impair a provision wisely calculated to promote the happiness and prosperity of the North<
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