Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Randolph or search for John Randolph in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
in, Wellington Hobson, Julius A. Hackett, James H. Harrison, Samuel J. Harvey, John B. Isaacs, Wm. B. Jinkins, Andrew James, Edwin T. Johnston, Andrew Lyons, William H. Leftwich, John H. McCance, Thomas W. McKeil, John W. Martin, Jordan H. Meredith, R. L. Mitchell, John (Irish patriot). Maury, Robert H. Montague, John H. Purcell, John Perkins, E. T. Paine, Robert A. Palmer, George S. Peachy, Dr. St. G. Quarles, Benj. M. Randolph, Joseph W. Richardson, R. P. Royster, George W. Spence, E. B. Starke, P. H. Starke, Marcellus T. Sutton, William M. Snead, William W. Staples, W. T. Smith, George W. Smith, Samuel B. Scott, James A. Tucker, John R. Tyndall, Mark A. Valentine, Mann S. Wright, Philip J. Wells, Alex. B. Wilson, Edward Wilson, John J. Worthan, C. T. Wortham, C. E. Weisiger Powhatan Whitlock, Chas. E. Whitlock, John E. Wynne, Chas. H.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hon. James Murray Mason, of Mason & Slidell fame. (search)
at the two latter places and had full intercourse with the leading men of the day. He had the highest admiration for John Randolph, of Roanoke, and Mr. Randolph had an exalted admiration for him. It was, if we remember aright, in 1828, when the preMr. Randolph had an exalted admiration for him. It was, if we remember aright, in 1828, when the presidential canvass was going on between General A. Jackson and Mr. John Quincy Adams, that Mr. Randolph made his inimitable speech in the Senate of the United States, comparing wisdom and knowledge, the personations of which were Jackson and Adams, coMr. Randolph made his inimitable speech in the Senate of the United States, comparing wisdom and knowledge, the personations of which were Jackson and Adams, contrasted. It was unique in all its characteristics, extremely eloquent, and nicely critical, and was, perhaps, the last, if not the first, speech of Mr. Randolph which he ever reported for himself. He called it his longo emendacior speech, had itMr. Randolph which he ever reported for himself. He called it his longo emendacior speech, had it printed in pamphlet form, and circulated it among his friends and those whom he specially admired. One of the copies was inscribed by him to Mr. Mason as a worthy son of worthy sires. This was written on the back of the printed speech, and it is t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
at there is a modern school of thought which assumes that for an intellectual growth a man should be born and reared in a city or a closely settled neighborhood—a hothouse, so to speak, in which his brain and energies are to be stimulated to the highest degree. But history gives little warrant for such an assumption. The great men of this country certainly were nearly all of them country bred. Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Calhoun, Patrick Henry, John Marshall, George Mason, John Randolph, Henry Clay, Henry A. Wise, Abel P. Upshur, William C. Rives, Silas Wright, Thomas H. Benton, Andrew Jackson, Francis P. Blair, Abraham Lincoln, William J. Bryan, and many more I could adduce were the product of country life—of plantation life—and almost without exception had not only the plantation manners, in which dignity and good breeding were happily blended, but possessed also the genius and force in affairs which plantation life and duties and contact with Nature rather than with <