Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 16, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Randolph or search for Randolph in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

e those which made demands upon the Northern States, and he believed that when those demands came from the committee, they would meet with no opposition upon this floor. They would embrace all that was necessary for the protection of Virginia. There might be some difference of opinion as to the method proposed, of a direct appeal to the people; but his own opinion was, that if it was carried, the Northern people were now prepared to say that they would give to Virginia anything, within the bounds of right, which she thinks proper to demand. Mr. Randolph, of Richmond city, indicated his purpose to address the Convention, but as the hour was late, he would prefer to postpone his remarks until to-morrow, if any gentleman felt disposed to move an adjournment. On motion of Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, the Committee rose; and, the President having resumed the Chair, reported progress, and asked leave to sit again. On motion of Mr. Hall, of Lancaster, the Convention adjourned.
The Convention. A motion to take up Mr. Richardson's resolution of inquiry concerning the military strength of the Commonwealth, was yesterday voted down. Secession resolutions from the counties of Northampton, Mecklenburg, Pulaski, and Buckingham, were presented by the respective delegates, with suitable comments, and referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. The debate upon the committee's reports was opened by Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, in Committee of the Whole. He advocated the majority report, and made a strong argument in favor of the legal right of secession, but conceives it to be the duty of the Convention to make further efforts for the restoration of the Union. Mr. Randolph, of Richmond city, has the floor for to-day.