Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Randolph or search for Robert Randolph in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
A. Kittrell; Duplin, Joseph T. Rhodes; Edgecombe, William S. Battle, George Howard, Jr.; Forsyth, Rufus L. Patterson; Gaston, Sidney X. Johnston; Guilford, John A. Gilmer, R. P. Dick; Halifax, Richard H. Smith; Henderson, William M. Shipp; Iredell, Anderson Mitchell; Mecklenburg, William Johnston, James W. Osborne; New Hanover, R. H. Cowan. Robert Strange; Northampton, D. A. Barnes; Orange, William A. Graham; Perquimans, Joseph S. Cannon (?); Person, John W. Cunningham; Pitt, Bryan Grimes; Randolph, William J. Long, Alfred G. Foster; Richmond, Walter F. Leak; Rowan, Burton Craige, Hamilton C. Jones, Richard A. Caldwell; Sampson, Thomas Bunting (?); Stokes, John Hill; Wake, Kemp P. Battle; Washington, William S. Pettigrew; Wayne, George V. Strong. The Convention had 120 members. Resignations, deaths, and new elections increased this number to about 139. About one-third of these had been students in this University. The secretaryship of the convention was given to one of her sons
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A parallel for Grant's action. (search)
long, unceasing strain of battle, with its harassments and its killings, had brought his once formidable army to so low a state of morale and discipline that there was well-grounded fear of its total dissolution by wholesale desertion and straggling after Antietam, if we may believe General Lee's own statements and those of D. H. Hill and others. September 22d, five days after the battle, his total infantry force present for duty was officially stated at only 35,757. Lee telegraphed Secretary Randolph September 23d, that unless something is done the army will melt away. In short, at this time the Confederate outlook was gloomy. The fortunes of the Confederacy were then at a lower ebb, in my opinion, than at any other period of its existence, except during the last few months prior to the final collapse in 1865. Its army was reduced to a frazzle by its frightful losses, and other causes far more more dangerous to its existence; the object of its chief general's campaign had been
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
and who was afterwards promoted to Colonel. On the 18th of May, 1861, the following officers of the Black Horse were sworne in: William H. Payne, captain; Robert Randolph, C. H. Gordon, A. D. Payne, lieutenants; Willian Smith, James H. Childs, Robert Mitchell, Richard Lewis, sergeants; Willington Millon, Madison C. Tyler, Georghem to be not toy knights, but soldiers in the Spartan sense of the word. When General William H. Payne was promoted, he was succeeded as captain, by Lieutenant Robert Randolph, and Lieutenant A. D. Payne followed Captain Randolph, and was the last captain of the Black Horse. General Payne has frequently been offerred prefermeCaptain Randolph, and was the last captain of the Black Horse. General Payne has frequently been offerred preferment since the war, but has turned his heart away from political life, and is content to follow the quiet pursuits of his profession. He is still in the vigor of manhood, and is the present counsel for the Richmond and Danville system of the Southern Railroad. Captain A. D. Payne, whose untimely death about two years ago, was de