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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
ntry (miscalled cavalry) was bearing on Five Forks, and General Pickett was advanced to that point at the head of Gravelly Run fork, on the White Oak road; and General Meade's corps of 25,000 men was advancing in our front across Arthur's creek. Ransom's and Hunton's brigades were taken from our division, to reinforce Pickett at Five Forks and Evans' old brigade, of South Carolina, then commanded by General W. H. Wallace, and our brigade were alone left at Hatcher's Run. On the 29th March, ourhe 6th April. What was left of our division, Wise's brigade of Virginia, and Wallace's of South Carolina, were posted on the left of Pickett's division, then reduced to an inconsiderable number by the stampede at Five Forks. Corse's brigade and Ransom's had stood their ground there well, and suffered very much. Whilst in position at the forks of the road when the baggage train passed to the right and the artillery to the left, we were ordered to detail two regiments to guard the left of Walla
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Drewry's Bluff. (search)
one hour, I sent the latter to the Pres't [Davis], to tell him that, if he w'd that day (the 14th) send me 10,000 men from the troops about Richmond (5,000 under Ransom) & General Lee's army, I w'd attack Butler's 30,000 men (who had been successful in the afternoon of the 13th in taking the outer line of defences) capture or deseturn at once to Richard & get the Pres't to issue them—about one hour after the latter arrived, & after a long conference, he refused to issue them, except as to Ransom's command, which came only on the morning of the 15th & the battle of D's b. was fought & won on the 16th—if General Whiting had obeyed my orders, which I sent hiove, or Baltimore Southern Magazine in which they were published a few years since, numbers of which I sent you at the time. I regret that I have not a copy of Ransom's subterfuge in defence of Bragg or I w'd send it to you with pleasure, but you will probably find it in the back files of the Richard Whig, in which, I think, it
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
d to Glen Dale and occupied the battlefield, where Longstreet and Hill had made their slendid fight unsupported, although 50,000 men were within a radius of three miles. General Huger's forces, consisting of Mahone's, Wright's, Armistead's and Ransom's brigades, were ordered down the Charles City road early Sunday morning, the 29th. At the request of General Magruder, one brigade (Ransom's) was sent back; but, so far as we can learn from these reports, there was no interruption to the marchRansom's) was sent back; but, so far as we can learn from these reports, there was no interruption to the march of the other brigades down the Charles City road, until they reached Fisher's run, within three miles of the cross roads at Glen Dale. The enemy had blocked the road for a mile with felled trees, and planted their guns on the south side of the stream, and succeeded in detaining Mahone at that point all day. A flank movement of his infantry through the woods to his right would have turned the position and placed him in easy reach of General Longstreet's left. Longstreet, in his report, complai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
er way. The movement was finally made, the forces engaged on the south of the Neuse river, consisting of Generals Hoke's and Clingman's North Carolina brigades and a portion of Corse's brigade, with the 38th battalion of artillery, consisting of the Richmond Fayette artillery, Caskie's battery, Stribling's battery and Latham's battery; General Dearing, with his cavalry and three regiments of infantry, was to threaten the north of the Neuse, while Benton's and Terry's Virginia brigades and Matt. Ransom's North Carolina brigade, with some cavalry and artillery, were to move on the Trent road. At the time of issuing of orders for the above movement, the Fayette Artillery, of Richmond, was in winter-quarters at Petersburg. The men had erected good quarters, and were greatly enjoying the rest so much needed by them. In fact, they were so nicely fixed that they entertained strong hopes it would be a long time ere they should have to take another long march, or participate in some blood
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
Following are the Virginia members of the Six Hundred: Lieutenant-Colonels. Charles B. Christian, Forty-ninth Infantry, Allen's creek, Amherst county. James C. Council, Twenty-sixth Infantry, St. Steven's Church. Majors. Richard Woodrum, Twenty-sixth Battalion, Union, Monroe co. Peter V. Batte, Forty-fourth Battalion, Petersburg. William H. Hood, Petersburg Militia, Berlin, Southampton co. D. A. Jones, General M. Jones' staff, Harrisonburg. Thomas P. Branch, General Ransom's staff, Petersburg. Captains. J. McD. Carrington, Charlottesville Battery, Charlottesville. E. E. DePriest, Twenty-third Infantry, Richmond. W. P. Carter, Page's Battery, Millwood, Clarke county. George W. Mercer, Twenty-ninth Battery, Rural Retreat. J. H. Johnson, Twenty-fifth Virginia, Franklin, Pendleton co. J. J. Dunkle, Twenty-fifth Infantry, Franklin, Pendleton co. H. C. Dickinson, Second Cavalry, Liberty, Bedford county. J. W. Mathews, Twenty-fifth Infantry