Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert Ransom or search for Robert Ransom in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
Colonel Alabama Infantry, Dea's Brigade, Withers's Division, Army of Tennessee.) Lucius M. Walker. 1464. Born Tennessee. Appointed at Large. 15. Brigadier-General, March 11, 1862. Commanding Cavalry Brigade in Sterling Price's Army. Killed in duel September 19, 1863, by Major-General J. S. Marmaduke. Armistead L. Long. 1466. Born Virginia. Appointed Virginia. 17. Brigadier-General, September 21, 1863. Chief of Artillery, Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Robert Ransom. 1467. Born North Carolina. Appointed North Carolina. 18. Major-General, May 26, 1863. Commanding Division, Army Northern Virginia, at battle of Fredericksburg; in 1864 commanded Department of Richmond. Charles S. Winder. 1471. Born Maryland. Appointed Maryland. 22. Brigadier-General, March 1, 1862. Commanding brigade, Jackson's Division, Army of Northern Virginia. Killed August 9, 1862, at Cedar Run, Va. N. Bartlett Pearce. 1475. Born Kentucky. Appointed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
following day General Hoke attacked the fortifications and carried them, although he lost a good part of his men. General Ransom's Brigade alone left nearly six hundred dead and wounded on the field. General Ransom distinguished himself by leaGeneral Ransom distinguished himself by leading his men over the enemy's works, where occurred a hand-to-hand fight. The Federal Commander, General Wessells, made a gallant defense, but Ransom and Hoke forced him to surrender. The enemy's loss was very heavy. His dead lay in heaps, and hRansom and Hoke forced him to surrender. The enemy's loss was very heavy. His dead lay in heaps, and his wounded were lying on all sides. During the assault the Albemarle played upon the forts also, but the Federal boats were too cautious to return. After the capture of Plymouth, N. C., April 19, 1864—by Generals Hoke and Ransom—in which action tRansom—in which action the Confederate ram, Albemarle, destroyed one gunboat of the Federal fleet and drove the others into Pamlico Sound; the Confederates were greatly encouraged and the Federals correspondingly discouraged and alarmed. The Yankees spoke of the ram as t<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
ones, who had been killed at Mount Hope Church on Hunter's advance. We began our movement down the Valley from Staunton, Ransom's Cavalry Division on the roads right and left of the Valley pike and the infantry and artillery on the macademized road would have given me about one thousand prisoners and much baggage, wagons and artillery. But my commanding officer, General Ransom, thought I was over sanguine because it was my own place, and refused to allow the movement to be executed. He direcen engaged with and which moved forward with a steady alignment, very unusual for dismounted cavalry. I sent word to General Ransom to come to my position, that the infantry had arrived, and that it was about time for cavalry to leave. He soon jodepleted divisions of Gordon, Rodes, Breckinridge and Ramseur, of about 8,500 muskets, the Cavalry Division of Major-General Robert Ransom, consisting of the brigades of Jackson, Johnson, McCausland and Imboden, about 2,000 badly armed, worse equip
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign and battle of Lynchburg. (search)
Corps. In his memoirs (on page 44) General Early says that some time after midnight it was discovered that Hunter was moving, but, owing to the uncertainty as to whether he was merely changing front or retreating, nothing could be done until daylight, when, the retreat being ascertained, the pursuit commenced. Early's army moved in three columns, the Second Corps on the Salem Turnpike, Breckinridge's command, under Elzey, on the Forest road, and the cavalry, placed by Early under General Robert Ransom, on the right of Elzey. The enemy's rear was overtaken at Liberty by Ramseur's Division and was driven through that place at a brisk trot. It is not within the scope of this paper to follow up the retreat of Hunter, nor to narrate the incidents of Early's campaign in Maryland and the scare he gave the Government at Washington. What a commotion his little army created can be easily understood by inspecting the 70th and 71st volumes of the War of the Rebellion, a large part of whi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
re, J. C.. 58. Mouton, J. J., A. A., 62. Mullens, J., 18. Murray, E., 49. Myers, A. C., 36. Napier, L., 73. Nicholls, F. R. T., 68. Northrop, L. B., 45. Palfrey, E. A., 72. Patterson, C. E., 76. Pearce, N. B., 61. Peck, L., 72. Pegram, J., 67. Pickett. G. E., 56. Pemberton, J. C.. 39. Pender, W. D., 67. Pendleton, W. N., 44. Polk, L., 42; M. T., 64. Quattlebaum, P. J., 71. Radford, R. C. W., 54. Rains, G. J., 43; G. W., 50. Ramseur, S. D., 74. Randal, H., 68. Ransom, R.. 61. Reynolds, A, W. 46; F. A., 76; S. H., 60. Rhett, T. G.,54; T. S., T. 57. Rich. L. L., 66. Riley, E. B. D., 75. Ripley, R. S., 52. Robinson, W. G., 73. Rogers, C. G.. 66. Ross, R. R., 66. Ruggles, D.. 36. Rust, A. T. M., 51. Rutledge, A. M., 39. Saunders, J. P., 72. Sears, C. W., 49. Shoup, F. A., 69. Shaaf, J. T.. 63. Sibley, H. H., 46. Sloan, B., 74. Smead, A., 68. Smith, E. K.,54; F. H., 36; G. W. 50; J A., 66; L., 38; M.,63; M. L., 51; .D.55; W. P., 71.