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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ransom, Thomas Edward Greenfield 1834- (search)
Ransom, Thomas Edward Greenfield 1834- Military officer; born in Norwich, Vt., Nov. 29, 1834; was taught engineering in early life, and was a land-agent and civil engineer in Illinois when the Civil War broke out, when he became lieutenant-colonel of the 11th Illinois Volunteers. He was wounded in leading a charge at Charlestown, Mo., in 1861; took part in the capture of Fort Henry; and led his regiment in the attack on Fort Donelson, where he was again wounded. He was promoted to colonelf Shiloh. In June following (1862) he became chief of General McClernand's staff and inspector-general of the Army of the Tennessee. In November he was made brigadier-general of volunteers, and the next year distinguished himself at Vicksburg. Ransom was conspicuous for his skill and bravery in Banks's Red River expedition, and was severely wounded in the battle at Sabine Cross-roads. He commanded the 17th Corps in the Atlanta campaign, and was brevetted major-general of volunteers Sept. 1,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sabine cross-roads, battle of. (search)
n 1864. Franklin's troops moved forward, with General Lee's cavalry in the van, followed by two thin divisions under General Ransom. General Emory followed Ransom. Among his troops was a brigade of colored soldiers. Lee was ordered to attack the CRansom. Among his troops was a brigade of colored soldiers. Lee was ordered to attack the Confederates wherever he should find them, but not to bring on a general engagement. Franklin advanced to Pleasant Hill (q. v.), where Banks joined him. Near Sabine Cross-roads, Lee found the trans-Mississippi army, fully 20,000 strong, under several Confederate leaders. Waiting for the main army to come up, Lee and Ransom were attacked (April 8), by the Confederates. At a little past noon, General Banks arrived at the front, and found the skirmishers hotly engaged. Orders were sent to Frankle first, was stubbornly resisted, but, finding the Confederates gaining their rear, the Nationals fell back, and were received by General Emory, who was advancing. Ransom lost ten guns and 1,000 men captured, and Lee 156 wagons filled with supplies.