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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 8 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 37 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 31 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 22 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 16 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 7 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 17, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Ransom or search for Ransom in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

ointment. Desultory Brag continued through the night, and about five o'clock on yesterday morning the commenced in earnest. The attack was by our forces, and among the brigades engaged were Gracey's, Kemper's, Johnson's, Barton's, Corse's, and Ransom's. It is stated that after the battle commenced, our men allowed the enemy to get possession of a fortification, when a fight took piece, almost hand-to-hand, the opposing being at times within ten yards of each other, and almost blinded by the iver, and extended with more or less severity along the whole line. The enemy's line extended to the vicinity of Drewry's Bluff, leaving but a small space between their right flank and the river. Their right flank was turned by a force under Gen. Ransom, and they were driven towards their centre with considerable loss. The bring could be distinctly heard from the city and was the occasion of considerable excitement. As the favorable accounts came in however, everybody seemed satisfied,