hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 49 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 32 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 11 3 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 2 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Dunbar R. Ransom or search for Dunbar R. Ransom in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

d have carried them. I discussed the order with Wagner, Harker, and Sherman, and they were similarly impressed, so while anxiously awaiting the signal I sent Captain Ransom of my staff to Granger, who was at Fort Wood, to ascertain if we were to carry the first line or the ridge beyond. Shortly after Ransom started the signal guRansom started the signal guns were fired, and I told my brigade commanders to go for the ridge. Placing myself in front of Harker's brigade, between the line of battle and the skirmishers, accompanied by only an orderly so as not to attract the enemy's fire, we moved out. Under a terrible storm of shot and shell the line pressed forward steadily throughscent of the ridge began, and I rode into the ditch of the intrenchments to drive out a few skulkers who were hiding there. Just at this time I was joined by Captain Ransom, who, having returned from Granger, told me that we were to carry only the line at the base, and that in coming back, when he struck the left of the division,
, Md., and not engaged in the battle.] Captain Joseph W. Martin. First United States, Batteries K and L, Lieutenant Franck E. Taylor. Second United States, Batteries B and L, Captain Charles H. Peirce. Second United States, Battery D, Lieutenant Edward B. Williston. Second United States, Battery M,[At Pleasant Valley, Md., and not engaged In the battle.] Lieutenant Carle A. Woodruff. Third United States, Batteries C, F, and K,[At Pleasant Valley, Md., and not engaged In the battle.] Captain Dunbar R. Ransom. Fourth United States, Batteries C and E,[At Pleasant Valley, Md., and not engaged In the battle.] Lieutenant Terence Reilly. moved at 3 o'clock that morning. The plan was for Torbert to advance with Merritt's division of cavalry from Summit Point, carry the crossings of the Opequon at Stevens's and Lock's fords, and form a junction near Stephenson's depot, with Averell, who was to move south from Darksville by the Valley pike. Meanwhile, Wilson was to strike up the Berryvil
ennsylvania, Major John W. Phillips. Second brigade: Colonel William Wells. Third Indiana (two companies), Lieutenant Benjamin F. Gilbert. First New Hampshire (battalion), Colonel John L. Thompson. Eighth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Benjamin. Twenty-second New York, Major Charles C. Brown. First Vermont, Lieutenant-Colonel John W. Bennett. horse-artillery: Second United States, Batteries B and L, Captain Charles H. Peirce. Third United States, Batteries C, F, and K, Captain Dunbar R. Ransom. Toward 6 o'clock the morning of the 19th, the officer on picket duty at Winchester came to my room, I being yet in bed, and reported artillery firing from the direction of Cedar Creek. I asked him if the firing was continuous or only desultory, to which he replied that it was not a sustained fire, but rather irregular and fitful. I remarked: It's all right; Grover has gone out this morning to make a reconnoissance, and he is merely feeling the enemy. I tried to go to sleep
rear-guard along that leading from J. Boisseau's to Five Forks. By 2 o'clock in the afternoon Merritt had forced the enemy inside his intrenchments, which began with a short return about three-quarters of a mile east of the Forks and ran along the south side of the White Oak road to a point about a mile west of the Forks. From the left of the return over toward Hatcher's Run was posted Mumford's cavalry, dismounted. In the return itself was Wallace's brigade, and next on its right came Ransom's, then Stewart's, then Terry's, then Corse's. On the right of Corse was W. H. F. Lee's division of cavalry. Ten pieces of artillery also were in this line, three on the right of the works, three near the centre at the crossroads, and four on the left, in the return. Rosser's cavalry was guarding the Confederate trains north of Hatcher's Run beyond the crossing of the Ford road. I felt certain the enemy would fight at Five Forks-he had to-so, while we were getting up to his intrenchme