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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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reat, if not greater, than our own. The following is a list of commanding officers killed and wounded in the engagement: Gen. Stark, of Mississippi, commanding Jackson's division, killed. Brig.-Gen. Branch, of North-Carolina, killed. Brig.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, wounded in hip, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Wright, of Georgia, flesh wounds in breast and leg. Brig.-Gen. Lawton, in leg. Brig.-Gen. Armistead, in the foot. Brig.-Gen. Ripley, in neck, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Ransome, of North-Carolina, slightly. Col. Alfred Cummings, in command of Wilcox's brigade, slightly. Doc. 123.-skirmish at Pocataligo, S. C. A National account. Beaufort, S. C., June 1, 1862. On Thursday morning last, May twenty-ninth, a skirmish occurred at Pocataligo, a point near the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, between Salcahatchie and Coosahatchie, in which our forces, under command of Col. B. C. Christ, of the Fiftieth Pennsylvania volunteers, routed about eight
ial of the dead was unfounded. The prisoners stated that their force was more than a hundred thousand strong, and that McClellan commanded the army in person. Our loss is estimated at five thousand in killed, wounded and missing. The prisoners state that their ranks were greatly decimated, and that the slaughter was terrible, from which we may infer that the enemy's loss was fully as great, if not greater, than our own. The following is a list of commanding officers killed and wounded in the engagement: Gen. Stark, of Mississippi, commanding Jackson's division, killed. Brig.-Gen. Branch, of North-Carolina, killed. Brig.-Gen. R. H. Anderson, wounded in hip, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Wright, of Georgia, flesh wounds in breast and leg. Brig.-Gen. Lawton, in leg. Brig.-Gen. Armistead, in the foot. Brig.-Gen. Ripley, in neck, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Ransome, of North-Carolina, slightly. Col. Alfred Cummings, in command of Wilcox's brigade, slightly.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
last guns of the infantry at Appomattox. Of this and other commands, Gloucester's dead were piled on every battle field: Page, Taylor, Fitzhugh, Puller, Ellis, Robins, Hibble, Baytop, Millers, Roane, Bridges, Banks, Norton, Amory, Cooke, Edwards, Griffin, Massey, Newcomb, Bristow, Jones, Barry, Ware, Simcoe, R. B. Jones, Kenan, Pitts, Pointer, Leigh, Jeff Dutton, Elijah Dutton, Vincent Edwards, Dunstan, Hughes, Evans, Cary, Thos. Robins, Freeman, John Roane, Jenkins, Hobday, Albert Roane, Ransome, White, J. W. Robins, Woodland, Cooper, Summerson, Williams, Hogg, Sparrow, T. J. Hibble, Alex. Dutton, John Edwards, Rich, Dutton again, Dunbar Edwards, Gwyn—I cease to call the roll, for they are absent by fifties and hundreds, and not a man answers to his name! In this succinct, didactic narrative, not half justice could be done to these martys to civil liberty. Their lives and deaths were the most beautiful epic poems. They will be sung and celebrated as long as liberty lasts; as l