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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Von Raumer or search for Von Raumer in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
sort of right-hand man to Metternich. He is, however, a Prussian by birth, and was for some years Professor of History at Berlin; but he became a Catholic, and that rendered him a little uncomfortable at home and very valuable here, so he was brought, nothing loath, and established in Metternich's Chancery with a great salary. He denies being an absolutist in politics, and founds much of his governmental doctrine upon the sacred preservation of property and its rights; is very hard upon Von Raumer; thinks the English Ministry are ruining everything by attacking the Irish Church incomes, etc., etc . . . . At half past 9 in the evening I drove out with Baron Lerchenfeld, the Bavarian Minister, to Schonbrunn, to see Prince Metternich. . . . . Just at ten o'clock we ascended the little bank of the dry Wien, and from its bridge looked down upon the wide palace of Schonbrunn, lighted brilliantly in all its apartments, as not only the Emperor is there, but the King of Naples and Mar
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
Chapter 6: Paris. Von Raumer. Fauriel. Duke and Duchess e Broglie. Guizot. Miss Clarke. Coquerel. Jouy. Confalonieri. Count Mole Augustin Thierry. Lamartine. Count Circourt. Mignet. Cesare Balbo. Mad. De Pastoret. Louis Philippe and his family. Journal. Paris, September 18. He had reached Paris September 11.—I was at Bossange's book-shop and two or three other similar establishments to-day. They are less ample and less well supplied with classicagood deal of their profits to reprinting popular authors with extravagant ornaments, like Gil Blas, La Fontaine, and Paul and Virginia, which have recently been published with engravings on every page . . . . September 20.—I had a visit from Von Raumer this morning. He is in Paris to consult and make extracts from the Archives of the Foreign Affairs, and is now near the end of a two-months' labor for his great historical work, like that which he gave to it, last year and the year before, in
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
all We are all quite well; but I am grievously pushed for time. G. T. To William H. Prescott, Boston. Paris, March 5, 1838. my dear William,—I send you a single line by this packet, to let you know that three days ago I received from Bentley the six copies of your Ferdinand and Isabella. One I sent instantly to Julius, Dr. Julius, of Hamburg, a scholar and philanthropist, had been in the United States in 1834-35. by Treuttel and Wurtz, his booksellers here, as he desired; one to Von Raumer by a similar conveyance, with a request to him to review it; one to Guizot, whose acknowledgment I received the same evening, at de Broglie's, with much admiration of a few pages he had read, and followed by a note this morning, which I will keep for you; one to Count Circourt, who will write a review of it, and of whom Thierry said to me the other night, If Circourt would but choose some obscure portion of history, between A. D. 500 and 1600, and write upon it, he would leave us all behi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
ulties seem as active, and his pursuit of knowledge as eager as ever; while, at the same time, his benevolence seems to grow with his years. and the entertainment of a great Court dinner at Potsdam, on occasion of the arrival of the Grand Duke of Baden for his marriage with a princess of Prussia. This was Mr. Ticknor's only opportunity for conversation with the then reigning sovereign, Frederic William IV., whose varied accomplishments and versatile talent made a strong impression on him. Von Raumer and Count Raczynski, among old acquaintances, and the younger Schadow, among new ones, added to the pleasures of Berlin. On finally leaving Dresden, September 25, Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor had further proof of the constancy of those who had formerly been kind to them, in the warm and earnest welcome given to the whole party at Tetschen, where they stopped a few hours to see Count Thun and his daughters. See Vol. I. p. 505 et seq. Old memories were recalled,—some sadly and tenderly, for t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
f boots; I had never paid a penny to go to the play or to see a sight, but I owned above six hundred volumes of good books, well bound. To Hon. Edward Twisleton. Boston, January 18, 1859. my dear Twisleton,—I thank you for the correction you have taken the pains to send me of an error in my History of Spanish Literature, which I immediately entered in the margin of the copy from which I intend speedily to reprint it. I only wish my other friends would be equally observant and kind. Von Raumer sent me one correction much like yours,--telling me that Ferdinand, whom —in note 10 to Chapter XI. of the First Part—I had called father of John I. of Portugal, was, in fact, his half-brother. But this is all, and I mention it because it is so, as well as from its odd similarity to the one you have suggested. Even in the notes to the German and Spanish translations few mistakes have been pointed out. Now all this would be very consoling,—even very gratifying,—if it were not for one
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, record of his death, I. 438. Villiers, Hon., Edward, I. 437 and note, II. 148, 180. Villiers, Hon. Mrs. Edward, I. 437 and note, II. 180, 372. Villiers, Mrs., I. 418, II. 147 and note, 148. Virginia, visits, I. 26, 31-38. Visconti Cav., P E., II. 59, 346, 347. Vogel von Vogelstein, I. 482, 490. Volkel, I. 121. Von der Hagen, I. 496. Von Hammnier-Purgstall, Baron, II. 2, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13. Von Hammer-Purgstall, Madame, 11. 2. Von Raumer, I. 485, 11. 5, 102, 330. Voss, J. H., I. 105, 106, 124, 125, 126. Voss, Madame, 1. 125, 126. Voss, Professor, I. 113. Voyages from England, I. 298, II. 183 Voyages to England, I. 49, 402, II. 321. W Waagen, G. F., I. 497, II. 383, 385. Wadsworth, James S., 11. 225 and note. Wadsworth, Miss, II. 225 and note. Wadsworth, Mr., James, I. 386. Wadsworth, Mrs. W. W., II. 281. Wagner, Dr., I. 154. Waldo, Mr., I. 14. Wales, Prince of, visit of, to the United States,