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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 8 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
ice that he drove back the enemy, Ewell, 3/4 of a mile, but got no support on the flanks, and had to retreat — the regulars much cut up. Implies censure on Wright, and apparently also on his corps commander, Warren. Wadsworth also driven back. Rawlins got very angry, considered the language mutinous, and wished him put in arrest. Grant seemed of the same mind and asked Meade: Who is this General Gregg? You ought to arrest him! Meade said: It's Griffin, not Gregg; and it's only his way of taructure and blew down that night! Bodies that lay between the lines were shot to pieces and could only be raised in a blanket! The result was damaging to the enemy — very — but the army of Lee was not cut in two--an issue clearly looked for by Rawlins and some others of Grant's Staff, but not so confidently assumed by those who knew a little more. --Lyman's Journal. The breastwork made a ridge between, and any living thing that showed above that line fell dead. The next day the bodies of fri<
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
w, but I am going to learn, so as to be able to explain it to people! Then the distinguished militaries crowded round to gaze. Major-General Ord, who can't get over his Irish blood, said: I believe, sir, you are the first man who medalled with his battalion. To which Grant, not taking the point in the faintest degree, replied gravely: I don't know but I was. There was a heavy crowd of Hectors, I can tell you. Generals Meade, Warren, Wright, Parke, Humphreys, Ord, Gibbon, Ayres, Griffin, Rawlins, Ingalls, etc., etc. Very few ladies. After this a moderate collation, and so home to bed. March 13, 1865 We have a long telegram from Sheridan, dated Columbia (a small place on the James, between Lynchburg and Richmond). His raid has been a complete surprise. After defeating Early utterly at Waynesboroa, he met with no further opposition, but entered Charlottesville and destroyed the rail and bridges; then struck south and got to the James, where he destroyed all destructible parts o
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
ridge, 130, 159. Po-Ny, 119. Pope, John, 60. Poplar Grove church, 234. Porter, David Dixon, 249. Porter, Georgia Ann (Patterson), 249. Porter, Horace, 142. Potter, Alonzo, 167. Potter, Robert Barnwell, 166, 212, 219, 234, 237, 296, 297, 334. Pourtales, Louis Auguste de, 212. Pratt, Mary, 26. Prisoners, provost, 13; Rebel, 32, 45, 324, 836, 347. Punishments, 243. Raccoon Ford, 19, 68, 69. Races, horse, 321. Railroad construction, 311. Rapidan River, 51. Rawlins, John Aaron, 91n, 114n. Reams' station, 224, 234. Rebels, fighting qualities, 87, 99, 100, 208; privations, 132; valuable qualities, 186; wearing down, 245, 271; deserters, 305, 310; appearance, 324, 360. Revere, Paul Joseph, 34. Review of troops, 9, 316, 318; 2d corps, 75; 9th corps, 261. Rice, James Clay, 109, 180. Rice's station, 352. Richmond, fall of, 343. Ricketts, James Brewerton, 98, 139, 144, 174, 176, 177, 184, 208, 232, 299. Riddle, William, 293. Ring, —, 172. Robe
columns — a melancholy appearance for a home. Horses that carried the orders of the General-in-chief: waiting on Grant at Bethesda church, June, 1864. Crack horses were a first requisite for Grant's staff, escort, and couriers. This photograph shows several at Bethseda Church, the little Virginia meeting-house where the staff had halted the day before Cold Harbor. The staff consisted of fourteen officers only, and was not larger than that of some division commanders. Brigadier-General John A. Rawlins was the chief. Grant's instructions to his staff showed the value that he placed upon celerity and the overcoming of delays in communicating orders. He urged his officers to discuss his orders with him freely whenever it was possible in the course of an engagement or battle, to learn his views as fully as possible, and in great emergencies, where there was no time to communicate with headquarters, to act on their own initiative along the lines laid down by him without his spe
e great horse carried the commander safely through the day. Daniel Webster was a dark bay about seventeen hands high, pure bred, with good action, never showing signs of fatigue, no matter how hard the test. He was extremely handsome, General Rawlins' mount It is a proud little darkey boy who is exercising the horse of a general — John Aaron Rawlins, the Federal brigadier-general of volunteers, who was later promoted to the rank of major-general, U. S. A., for gallant and meritorious John Aaron Rawlins, the Federal brigadier-general of volunteers, who was later promoted to the rank of major-general, U. S. A., for gallant and meritorious services during the campaign terminating with the surrender of the army under General Lee. The noble horse himself is looking around with a mildly inquiring air at the strange new instrument which the photographer is leveling at him. with more than ordinary horse-sense. He was a fast walker, an important requisite in a commander's charger, but a disagreeable quality for the staff officers whose horses were kept at a slow trot. After McClellan retired to private life, Dan became the family h
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabinet, President's (search)
h 7, 1837 John Bell March 5,1841 John C. Spencer Oct. 12, 1841 James M. Porter March 8, 1843 William Wilkins Feb. 15, 1844 William L. Marcy March 6, 1845 George W. Crawford March 8, 1841 Charles M. Conrad Aug.15, 1850 Jefferson Davis March 5, 1853 John B. Floyd March 6, 1857 Joseph Holt Jan. 18, 1861 Simon Cameron March 5, 1861 Edwin M. Stanton Jan. 15, 1862 Ulysses S. Grant, ad interimAug.12, 1867 Lorenzo Thomas, ad interimFeb. 21, 1868 John M. Schofield May 28, 1868 John A. Rawlins March11, 1869 William W. Belknap Oct. 25, 1869 Alphonso Taft March 8, 1876 James D. Cameron May 22, 1876 George W. McCrary March12, 1877 Alexander Ramsey Dec. 10, 1879 Robert T. Lincoln .March 5, 1881 William C. Endicott March 6, 1885 Redfield Proctor March 5, 1889 Stephen B. Elkins Dec. 17, 1891 Daniel S. Lamont March 6, 1893 Russel A. Alger March 5, 1897 Elihu Root Aug. 1, 1899 March 5,1901 secretaries of the Navy. Benjamin Stoddert May 21, 1798 Robert Smit
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rawlins, John Aaron 1831- (search)
Rawlins, John Aaron 1831- Military officer; born in East Galena, Ill., Feb. 13, 1831; was a farmer and charcoal-burner until 1854, but, studying law, was admitted to the bar at Galena in 1855. When Sumter fell he gave his zealous support to his government, going on the staff of General Grant in September, 1861, as assistant adjutant-general, with the rank of captain. He remained with General Grant throughout the war; was promoted brigadier-general in August, 1863; and majorgeneral in Mar1861, as assistant adjutant-general, with the rank of captain. He remained with General Grant throughout the war; was promoted brigadier-general in August, 1863; and majorgeneral in March, 1865. President Grant called Rawlins to his cabinet in the spring of 1869 as Secretary of War, which post he held until his death, in Washington, D. C., Sept. 9 following. After his death a popular subscription of $50,000 was made to his family, and a bronze statue was erected to his memory in Washington.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
tates revenuecutter......June 27, 1869 Soldiers' national monument at Gettysburg dedicated......July 1, 1869 Irish National Republican Convention meets in Chicago; 221 delegates......July 4-5, 1869 United States end of the Franco-American cable landed at Duxbury, Mass., July 23, and event celebrated......July 27, 1869 National Labor Convention meets in Philadelphia......Aug. 16, 1869 National Temperance Convention (500 delegates) meets in Chicago......Sept. 1-2, 1869 John A. Rawlins, Secretary of War, and General Grant's adjutant throughout the war, born 1831, dies at Washington, D. C.......Sept. 6, 1869 One hundred and eight men suffocated in a burning coal-mine at Avondale, Pa.......Sept. 6, 1869 William Pitt Fessenden, born 1806, dies at Portland, Me.......Sept. 8, 1869 Financial panic in New York City culminates in Black Friday ; gold quoted at 162 1/2......Sept. 24, 1869 George Peabody lands at New York, June 10; he endows several institutions, add
nal Convention at Chicago......May 20, 1868 Corner-stone of the new capitol at Springfield laid......Oct. 5, 1868 First river-tunnel in this country completed under the Chicago River; 810 feet long......December, 1868 U. S. Grant inaugurated President......March 4, 1869 Legislature ratifies the Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution; vote, in Senate 17 to 7; in House, 52 to 27......March 5, 1869 Elihu B. Washburne appointed Secretary of the Treasury......March 5, 1869 John A. Rawlins appointed Secretary of War......March 11, 1869 Appropriation made by legislature for the Northern Illinois Hospital for the Insane at Elgin......1869 Constitution framed by a convention at Springfield, May, 1870, ratified by the people; 134,227 to 35,443......July 2, 1870 Remains of President Lincoln transferred from the temporary tomb to the crypt of the monument at Oak Ridge Cemetery......May, 1871 Deepening of the Illinois and Michigan canal to create a current from Lak