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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John F. Ray or search for John F. Ray in all documents.

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the pontoon-bridge, and thus cut off General Hoke's brigade from any escape, except by swimming. Our extreme right being thrown back, the brave Colonel Godwin, although surrounded on all sides, except on the river-side, still fought on, and when compelled to yield ground to overwhelming odds, fell back with a force of about seventy-five men, still returning the enemy's fire, and refused to surrender until fighting was useless. Lieutenant-Colonel Tate and Major York, Captains McPherson and Ray, and Lieutenant Mebane, of the Sixth, with Captain Adams, of the staff, broke away, and escaped over the bridge in the darkness. Lieutenants Williams, Smith, and Fitzgerald, of the Fifty-fourth; Brown, of the Sixth, with a few others, plunged into the river and swam safely over; but, unfortunately, some others were drowned. Lieutenant-Colonel H. Jones, Jr., of the Fifty-seventh, and Captain White, of the Sixth, plunged in to swim, but the coldness of the water compelled them to put back.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
n. I omitted to mention in the proper place that Major Stevens, of the First Massachusetts cavalry, was with company C in the reconnoissance this afternoon. Captain Ray, formerly lieutenant of the same company, and about to take a command in another regiment now forming in Massachusetts, volunteered his services to the expeditill, and Lieutenant Holt, has achieved for itself during the past week a high reputation. In this connection I must not omit to mention the eagerness with which Captain Ray, formerly a Lieutenant in company C, accepted the opportunity to accompany Major Stevens as volunteer aid. He recently received his commission as captain in thessachusetts cavalry, and when the expedition left Hilton Head, was on the point of going North to join his regiment. All the distance from Jacksonville, either Captain Ray or Lieutenant Holt led the advance-guard. The Fortieth Massachusetts mounted infantry also performed admirable service, and by no means lessened the good name
Missouri cavalry, under Colonel C. C. Andrews, left Little Rock at eight P. M. of the thirtieth ultimo, reached Duvall's Bluff at four o'clock next morning, and embarked on the steamer Dove. With the iron-clad No. 25 we reached Gregory's Landing at dark. Secrecy being indispensable, we took every man we met prisoner. Disembarking, we moved in the dark toward the understood locality of the rebel McRay's camp, five miles distant. After fording the muddy branch of White River, we learned that Ray and his band had gone up the river to attack our transports then on their way to Batesville. Returning to our boat, we reached Augusta and landed at sunrise; then took up our line of march on the Jacksonport road, having learned that the enemy was posted in strong force near it. Less than a mile ahead, we discovered McRay's advance. They ran like Indians, and we chased about one mile, making several prisoners, and at length approaching a body of rebels who snowed some disposition to stand