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The Daily Dispatch: December 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 31, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for William A. Read or search for William A. Read in all documents.

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to jail. The women were also required to find a voucher for their good conduct in future. Maggie Hambleton, having been released from jail on Saturday, on furnishing such security was let off; but Jenny Lind, who could not give the bail, went to prison. Wm. H. Travis, proprietor of the Alhambra, on 14th street, was arraigned for keeping a disorderly and ill governed house. Alphens Travis, Francis Boggs, and Andrew Disney, arrested in the same house, were discharged. The case against Wm. H. Travis was continued until Friday next. Jas. S Taylor was examined for stealing a mare, worth $200, from Elizabeth Haupt, and sent on before the Hustings Court. Wm. A. Read, the young fellow implicated in the abduction (with John T. Smith) of a coat belonging to Geo. R. Howard, was brought into Court, and being confronted with the witness was identified as the same party with Smith on the occasion of the robbery. He was sent on for further examination before the Hustings Court.
Mr. Read's letter. The letter of Hon. Mr. Read, of Philadelphia, which has already been laid before our readers, expresses a strong desire that the U. S. Government would take measures for the restoration of peace. If such is the desire of the honorable gentleman, and those who think with him, --and we have no reason to doubt his sincerity,--they should adopt some practical mode of giving expression to their wishes, such as circulating memorials to their Congress for that object, and gettMr. Read, of Philadelphia, which has already been laid before our readers, expresses a strong desire that the U. S. Government would take measures for the restoration of peace. If such is the desire of the honorable gentleman, and those who think with him, --and we have no reason to doubt his sincerity,--they should adopt some practical mode of giving expression to their wishes, such as circulating memorials to their Congress for that object, and getting as many signers as possible. Unless the right of petition, as well as all other rights, is ignored by the Yankee Congress, they could not refuse to listen to their rational appeals. As to the South, she has always desired peace, and still desires it; but always and at all times upon the basis of Southern Independence.