hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 150 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 122 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 54 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Official Records or search for Official Records in all documents.

Your search returned 75 results in 30 document sections:

1 2 3
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
Deming; 21st Ind., Col. James W. McMillan; 26th Mass., Col. Edward F. Jones; 30th Mass., Col. N. A. M. Dudley; 31st Mass., Col. Oliver P. Gooding; 6th Mich., Col. Frederick W. Curtenius; 4th Wis., Col. Halbert E. Paine. Cavalry: 2d Mass. Battalion (2 cos.), Capts. S. Tyler Read and Henry A. Durivage. Artillery: 4th Mass. Battery, Capt. Charles H. Manning; 6th Mass. Battery, Capt. Charles Everett; 2d Vt. Battery, Capt. P. E. Holcomb. The strength of this command is reported at 6000 ( Official Records, Vol. VI., p. 708). The Confederate forces. Force afloat--Commander John K. Mitchell. name. 7-in. R. 9-in. S. B. 8-in. S. B. 32-pdr. R. 32-pdr. S. B. 24-pdr. 9-pdr. Howitzers. Total including Howitzers. naval vessels.                   Louisiana, Comr. Charles F. McIntosh (m w) 2 3 4 7         16 McRae, Lieut, Thos. B. Huger (m w)   1     6   1 Experimental gun.   8 Jackson (at Quarantine), Lieut. F. B. Renshaw         2       2 Ma
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Farragut's demands for the surrender of New Orleans. (search)
n the morning of April 26th in accordance with instructions from Farragut to Captain Morris of the Pensacola. But in a letter to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, dated April 27th, Farragut himself says: This morning at 6 A. M. I sent to Captain Morris, whose ship commanded the Mint, to take possession of it and hoist the American flag thereon, which was done and the people cheered it. The apparent contradictions of these various statements cannot be disposed of by a study of the Official Records. Neither do military and naval histories shed clear light on the subject. But the facts, half-truths, and explainable misapprehensions that can be sifted from the mass indicate that early on the morning of the 26th a boat's crew from the fleet, without orders from Farragut, raised a flag over the Mint. This flag was hauled down by Mumford on April 27th, as related above by Farragut, and another flag was raised over the Mint in accordance with the flag-officer's instructions to Captai
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Confederate use of subterranean shells on the Peninsula. (search)
had some of its men and horses killed and wounded by these shells. Our telegraph operator was sent into Yorktown soon after our troops had got possession of the place. He trod upon one of the buried shells, which burst and terribly mangled both of his legs, from which he died soon after in great agony. . . . In the casemates and covered ways about the fortifications I saw a number of large shells, placed so that they could easily be fired by persons unaware of their presence. The Official Records show that General Fitz John Porter referred to the buried shells in his report of the siege, and General William F. Barry, Inspector of Artillery, made a statement in detail, in a communication to army headquarters, August 25th, 1863. Porter's statement is that when the advance detachments entered Yorktown the command on the left was fired upon from the Red Fort. Those on the right experienced some losses from shells planted in the ground, which exploded when trod upon. Many of t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
. J.] ; D. H. Hill's division, . . . 11,151; cavalry brigade, 1289; reserve artillery, 1160; According to General Johnston's memorandum of May 21st, 1862, Official Records, Vol. XI., Part III., p. 531, the reserve artillery numbered 920.--Editors. total effective men, 53,688. The above is from Major Taylor's memorandum givth Carolina, and one from North Carolina (Anderson's), in all 8000, in addition to those [2500.--J. E. J.] previously there.--General Lee's letter, May 8th.--Official Records, Vol. XI., Part III., pp 500-1.--J. E. J. and the second, Branch's brigade, greatly strengthened to protect the railroad at Gordonsville, and estimated by Guld increase the interval between his left and the right, which was beyond the Chickahominy. McDowell's corps of 40,000 men McDowell says, May 22d, 1862, Official Records, Vol. XII., Part III., p. 214, that he would require subsistence for 38,000 men. This included both effectives and non-effectives. A fair deduction would l
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
on (k): 1st Tenn.; 7th Tenn.; 14th Tenn. Brigade loss: k, 44; w, 187; m, 13 = 244. Pettigrew's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. J. Pettigrew (w and c): Arkansas Battalion; 35th Ga.; 22d N. C.; 47th Va. Brigade loss: k, 47; w, 240; m, 54 == 341. The Official Records indicate that Semmes's and Griffith's brigades were in position for action, but were not actually engaged. The total loss of the Left Wing, as reported by General Smith, was 164 killed, 1010 wounded, and 109 missing = 1283. The aggregate Civision, about 1500; and 1 brigade and 2 regiments of Hooker's division, about 3500; there was no artillery with Kearny and Hooker. General Johnston estimates the strength of his army at 73,928. Other authorities place it at 62,696. The Official Records show that, on the 21st of May, Johnston's army was 53,688: Smith's division, 10,592; Longstreet's division, 13,816; Magruder's division (including D. R. Jones's division), 15,920; D. H. Hill's division, 11,151; cavalry and reserve artillery,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
ral, but more on the Confederate, side,--it may be added that the recent publication of the Official Records, when carefully studied, throws a great deal of light upon these events, the accounts of wh the general positions occupied by these three divisions until I saw the recently published Official Records. But I knew there was a gap between Whiting's right and Longstreet's left, and I knew, too several hours, and there was none of any consequence after that time. On reading in the Official Records the detailed reports of subordinate fighting commanders on both sides, I asked General D. Hivision commanders of troops closely engaged the second day are given in such detail in the Official Records, that, by comparing them with the limited number of Confederate reports found there a clearf the abatis, which our men succeeded in preventing, though with considerable loss. The Official Records contain no report from any commander in that portion of Armistead's or of Mahone's brigades
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
g, 22 = 590. General Shields reports ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., p. 342): Our force in infassing, 3 = 256. General Schenck says ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., pp. 462, 463), that he bro or missing = 2019. But Jackson claims ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 708) that the whof not more than 7000 effective men. (See Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 641.) Fremonssing = 102. General Fremont reports ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 19) that 10,500 mmissing = 4609. In his official report ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 688) General Shiee command of the troops in action, says ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 697) his force co on May 30th, is reported at 10,900 men ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. III., p.290). According 718. General Jackson, in his report ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., p. 383), says: Our number As nearly as can be ascertained from the Official Records, the loss in the campaign was 230 killed,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Union Army. (search)
450; missing, 22 = 590. General Shields reports ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., p. 342): Our force in infantry, cavalrded, 227; missing, 3 = 256. General Schenck says ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., pp. 462, 463), that he brought into th714 captured or missing = 2019. But Jackson claims ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 708) that the whole number of consisted of not more than 7000 effective men. (See Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 641.) Fremont's command,ptured or missing = 102. General Fremont reports ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 19) that 10,500 men is a libecaptured or missing = 4609. In his official report ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 688) General Shields gives hihad immediate command of the troops in action, says ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 697) his force could not havere division, on May 30th, is reported at 10,900 men ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. III., p.290). According to the same
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate Army. (search)
k, 15; w, 76; m, 71=162. Cavalry, 7th Va., Col. Turner Ashby; Va. Battery, Capt. R. P. Chew. Cavalry loss: k, 1; w, 17 =18. Total loss (March 22d and 23d): killed, 80; wounded, 375; missing, 263 = 718. General Jackson, in his report ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., p. 383), says: Our number present on the evening of the battle was, of infantry, 3087, of which 2742 were engaged; 27 pieces of artillery, of which 18 were engaged. Owing to recent heavy cavalry duty and the extent of countryt Royal, Winchester, etc., from May 23d to 31st, as 68 killed, 329 wounded, and 3 missing == 400. At Cross Keys and Port Republic the casualties were 139 killed, 951 wounded, and 60 missing == 1150. As nearly as can be ascertained from the Official Records, the loss in the campaign was 230 killed, 1373 wounded, and 232 captured or missing == 1878. The strength of Jackson's command is nowhere authoritatively stated. Colonel William Allan says in his Jackson's Valley campaign, p. 146: Jackso
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Jackson at Kernstown. (search)
ading as they slowly retired, and rallying in squads in every ravine and behind every hill — or hiding singly among the trees. They continued to make it very hot for our men in the advance. Night closing in too dark for pursuit, our weary soldiers bivouacked in positions from which they had driven the enemy. Our troops had fought without food since the evening of the 22d, and it was after midnight Map of the battle of Kernstown, Va., March 23, 1862. Based upon the maps in the Official Records, Vol. XII., Part I., pp. 362-365. A represents the first position of Kimball's and Sullivan's brigades on the morning of March 23d. Sullivan remained to hold the Union left, while Kimball moved to the position at B, and finally to the main battle-field, F (evening of March 23d), where he joined Tyler, who had previously been in position first at C, and then at D, whence he advanced to oppose Stonewall Jackson in his flanking position at F, to which Jackson had marched by wood roads fr
1 2 3