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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1860., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Reed or search for Reed in all documents.

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and was told by the Governor, I will kick you or any other Gentile judge from this stand, if you or they again attempt to interfere with the affairs of our Zion! He afterward said, If I had crooked my finger, the women would have torn him to pieces. Disliking such tenure of office and life, the Gentile Federal officers retreated from the Territory, and left affairs in the hands of their Mormon colleagues. Judge Shaver, who succeeded Brocchus, died, with some suspicion of foul play; and Judge Reed, his associate, returned to New York. A third set of officials was sent out in 1854, whose relations with the Mormon chiefs became still more unpleasant. A bitter controversy sprang up between Judge Drummond and the Saints, with mutual accusations of crime. The former charged the massacre of Lieutenant Gunnison's party on the Mormons, together with many other outrages; while the latter retorted with allegations of gross immorality. Judge Drummond, having got to Carson's Valley, took ca
he sent for aid. Grant was absent, at the river, with Foote; and as McClernand's messages became more urgent, General Lew Wallace, commanding the central division, finding himself unoccupied in front, moved Cruft's brigade up to the right, ill support of the retreating Federals. Cruft's brigade was composed of four regiments — the Thirty-first Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Osborn; Seventeenth Kentucky, Colonel McHenry; Twenty-fifth Kentucky, Colonel Shackleford; and Forty-fourth Indiana, Colonel Reed--in all about 2,300 strong. They came into position about ten o'clock, and found W. H. L. Wallace retiring in comparatively good order. But the regiments farther to their right were badly broken. The Twenty-fifth Kentucky, which was carried forward rather heedlessly, on the extreme right, and attempted to stem the tide of battle, was broken into fragments by the onset, and became hopelessly involved in the crowd of fugitives. Cruft bore the brunt of battle for some time; but, at lengt