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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. A. Reid or search for J. A. Reid in all documents.

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ne hundred and sixty-five missiles. Of the missing, the greater part were from stragglers and small parties of foragers captured. Some few were deserting bounty-jumpers, who had reached us just before marching from Atlanta. In the case of Captain Reid, One Hundred and Seventh New-York volunteers, missing with a detail of forty-three men, foraging, I have ordered a special report of the statements made by a rebel cavalry officer who was of the capturing party. If these statements are true, Captain Reid behaved in a most shameful and cowardly manner, and should be dismissed in disgrace. As both officer and men are still prisoners of war, no proper investigation can now be made. We captured on the march and before Savannah, thirty officers, (thirteen of whom were naval,) one hundred and thirty-five privates, and fourteen seamen. One hundred and twenty-two deserters came into our ranks. A tabular statement and list of officers captured, prepared by Major Parks, Provost-Marshal,
ne hundred and sixty-five missiles. Of the missing, the greater part were from stragglers and small parties of foragers captured. Some few were deserting bounty-jumpers, who had reached us just before marching from Atlanta. In the case of Captain Reid, One Hundred and Seventh New-York volunteers, missing with a detail of forty-three men, foraging, I have ordered a special report of the statements made by a rebel cavalry officer who was of the capturing party. If these statements are true, Captain Reid behaved in a most shameful and cowardly manner, and should be dismissed in disgrace. As both officer and men are still prisoners of war, no proper investigation can now be made. We captured on the march and before Savannah, thirty officers, (thirteen of whom were naval,) one hundred and thirty-five privates, and fourteen seamen. One hundred and twenty-two deserters came into our ranks. A tabular statement and list of officers captured, prepared by Major Parks, Provost-Marshal,
This embraces the entire loss in the division, with the exception of one battery, from which no report has been received. My thanks are due to all of my staff for faithful and efficient service. Major Ratchford, Adjutant-General, and Lieutenant Reid, Aid-de-camp, were much exposed, and were ever prompt and active. Major Pierson, Chief of Artillery, was always on horseback, by the side of the battery engaged. Captain Taylor, Inspector-General, rendered valuable and important service. one for duty. In the combat of Monday night, we took about twenty prisoners, the names and regiments of some of whom are remembered: Harrison Patrick, Twelfth Pennsylvania reserves, company B; Frederick Harvey, Fortieth New York, company H; Captain Reid, Twentieth Indiana regiment, company K, and fifteen or sixteen others, mostly of the Twentieth Indiana regiment. Having no place to keep these prisoners, they were turned over, by my direction, to a mounted escort in charge of prisoners. A
I got a battery in position which partially enfiladed the Yankee line, and aided materially to check its advance. This battery was brought up by my Aid, Lieutenant J. A. Reid, who received a painful wound in the discharge of that duty. In the mean time, General R. H. Anderson reported to me with some three or four thousand men rms of my brigade commanders, two of whom sealed their devotion to their country with their lives. Major Ratchford, Major Pierson, chief of artillery, and Lieutenant J. A. Reid, of my staff, were conspicuous for their gallantry. Captain Overton, serving temporarily with me, was wounded at Sharpsburg, but remained under fire until (severely wounded,) all commended themselves to my special notice by their gallant and meritorious conduct. Captain Rey, commanding Forty-fourth Georgia, and Captain Reid, Assistant Adjutant-General, are equally commended. Assistant Surgeon William P. Young remained on the field after he was wounded, caring for the wounded, and