hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 38 results in 18 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
al of historic value, and is a highly prized addition to our library. Books received. We acknowledge the receipt of the following books, which will be noticed more fully hereafter: From D. Appleton & Co., New York: Cooke's Life of General R. E. Lee. A military biography of Stonewall Jackson. By Colonel John Esten Cooke. With an appendix (containing an account of the Inauguration of Foley's statue, &c.), by Rev. J. Wm. Jones. General Joseph E. Johnston's Narrative. Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee. By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. Sherman's Memoirs and Shuckers' Life of Chief justice Chase. From the publishers, Harper Brothers, New York (through West & Johnston, Richmond): Draper's Civil war in America. From J. B. Lippincott, Philadelphia (through West & Johnston): Dixon's New America. From West & Johnston, Richmond: A beautiful lithograph of the Ordinance of Secession of Virginia, and the signatures of the members of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
The book is gotten up in the highest style of the printer's art, the engravings add to its attractiveness, and we hear it is meeting with a large sale. It is to be regretted that the publishers did not give Colonel Cooke the opportunity of revising and correcting his work, for while the book is very readable, and gives some exceedingly vivid pictures of old Stonewall on his rawbone sorrel, there are important errors in the narrative which ought by all means to be corrected. Personal Reminiscences. Anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee. By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. D. Appleton & Co., New York. We cannot, of course, give an unbiased judgment of this book. But we may say this, that the letters of General Lee, which the author was so fortunate as to secure, are among the most charming specimens of letter-writing in all the wide range of Literature, and that the view of his private, domestic, and Christian character thus given presents him to the world as one of the noble
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of General Lee's army in the Seven days battles around Richmond. (search)
iments of esteem you express, and I am sure that, if among us, he would frown most indignantly upon any effort to enhance his own reputation at the expense of yourself or any one else. I beg, General, that you will not regard me as one who has officiously volunteered in a dispute in which he has no interest. Having, in an address delivered at Lexington on the 19th of January, 1872, undertaken to establish what was the strength of our army around Richmond in June, 1862, and Mr. Jones having done me the honor of promulgating that address to the world (in his Personal Reminiscences of General Lee), I have felt that it was incumbent on me to vindicate the correctness of my estimates, which are so much at variance with your own. In doing so I have intended to be entirely respectful and courteous to you, and I trust you will so understand me. With the assurance of my highest esteem, I am, very respectfully and truly, your obedient servant, J. A. Early. General Joseph E. Johnston.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
some of the movable troops had to be left behind, and among them were two brigades of cavalry, Robertson's and Jones', as you will see from Gen. Lee's report in the same number of the Society Papers, pages 44-5. Those brigades arrived at Gettysburg on the 3d of July, too late to be of any service, except in guarding the trains on the retreat. The force with which Gen. Lee invaded Pennsylvania was really under 60,000 effectives, as I have stated in the address embodied in Mr. Jones' Personal Reminiscences, a separate copy of which I now send you. Gen. Lee's force against Mc-Clellan, in June, 1862, was between 75,000 and 80,000-a fact I think I have demonstrated in a communication which you will find in the June number of the Society Papers for 1876, page 413. The table before referred to shows the force for duty in the Department of Northern Virginia, at the close of July, 1862, just before the commencement of the campaign against Pope, was 69,559, and the force for duty at the close
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
nd after the short sentence he permitted only to be known. His reply to this was concluded in hasty language foreign to the enquiry, and he failed to produce anything more. In the narrative in the Times, once again appears the same sentence, only that and nothing more. It is possible that after General Lee's plans had been frustrated and his opportunity lost, he would naturally regret that he had not taken the advice of one who urged him not to attack. In the Rev. J. Wm. Jones' Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes, and letters of Lee, page 156, we find that General Lee, in speaking (to Professor White, of Washington and Lee University,) of the irreparable loss the South had sustained in the death of Jackson, said with emphasis: If I had had Stonewall Jackson at Gettysburg, we should have won a great victory. How, by General Lee's or General Longstreet's plan? Tell me, you who knew Jackson best, if he had been in command of troops, say four miles in rear of the battle-field on the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
ndignation that this error was not corrected in the French translation as he directed it to be. It will be a real pleasure to us to place on our shelves this able book of our distinguished friend. The following letters explain themselves, and will, doubtless, be of interest to our readers: Chateau D'Eu, Seine Inferieure, August 3d, 1876. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Virginia: Sir — I beg to acknowledge the receipt of the Personal Reminiscences of General Lee, which you were kind enough to send to me with your signature. I shall read with greatest interest that account, by one so well situated as you were, of the life and deeds of the great soldier, for whom my admiration has increasedd every day I have studied more closely his military achievements. Messrs. Coates & Co. having communicated to me your letter of July 1st, I now personally apply to you for my admission as a life member of the Southern Historical Society
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
n the French army, answer was made, as the front-rank man on right of his old company stepped forward and saluted: Mort sur le champ de bataille--dead upon the field of battle. Such monument, such epitaph, at least, is that of A. P. Hill, and the men of his old corps remember with sorrowful pride that his name lingered last upon the dying lips of Lee and of Jackson. Tell Hill he must come up. --Colonel Wm. Preston Johnston's account of Lee's last moments--Rev. J. Wm. Jones' Personal Reminiscences of General R. E. Lee, p. 451. A. P. Hill, prepare for action. --Dabney's Life of Jackson, p. 719. Of the other, who fell but the evening before at Five Forks, I almost fear to speak, lest I should do hurt to that memory which I would honor. For to those who knew him not, the simplest outline of a character so finely tempered by stern and gentle virtues, would seem but an ideal picture touched with the tender exaggeration of retrospective grief; while to so many of you who kne
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Professor Worsley's lines to General Lee. (search)
Professor Worsley's lines to General Lee. By J. William Jones. As there has been some dispute as to the authorship of the following beautiful lines, which were first published by me in Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes, and Letters of General R. E. Lee, it may be well to settle the point, as well as to preserve in our Papers the feeling tribute of the gifted Englishman. I had frequently seen them in the fly leaf of Worsley's translation of the Iliad, which he presented to General Lee, and by permission of the family, not long after the General's death, my friend, Professor E. S. Joynes, copied them for me. I thus introduced them in my Reminiscences : The following inscription and poem accompanied the presentation of a perfect copy of the Translation of the Iliad of Homer into Spencerian Stanza, by Philip Stanhope Worsley, Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Oxford — a scholar and poet whose untimely death, noticed with deepest regret throughout the literary world, in England, h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
erse and correspondence embracing all manner of delicate and difficult situations, to possess that quality which is the consummate flower of wisdom— unerring judgment combined with exquisite taste. The literature that may be found in the letters of the great, unfolds the very essence of the genius of the men, and of the times they lived in; and in my humble judgment it were sufficient to read the letters written by General Lee, and which are collated in the beautiful memorial volume Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes and Letters of General R. E. Lee, by J Wm. Jones, Secretary Southern Historical Society. prepared by Rev. Dr. J. Wm. Jones, to discern that the writer was one who profoundly comprehended the topics of the day, and wielded a pen as vigorous and polished as his sword. And when we contemplate in connection with his deeds, the fair and lofty character that is mirrored in them, we behold one whose strong, equitable and wide-reaching mind was such that had he devoted it to jur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Long's memoir of General R. E. Lee. (search)
the Confederate Soldiers' Home at Richmond), candor compels us to add several other things: 1. There is a marked and inexcusable failure to give proper credit to other authors, whose work has been freely used—e.g.: No one who has read Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes, and Letters of General R. E. Lee, by J. Wm. Jones, can fail to see that nearly every chapter of this book draws largely on that. Letters, anecdotes, and sometimes whole pages of the substance, if not the language of that booke same. And yet, with the exception of a general acknowledgment in the Preface of the use of the publications of Rev. J. M. Jones [whoever he is] and others, and an acknowledgment (on page 400), of a single anecdote as taken from Jones's Personal Reminiscences of General Lee, there is not the slightest intimation of the wholesale use of a book which cost the author years of hard work. 2. The letters in the Appendix, taken from General Lee's letter books, which are in the War Records office a
1 2