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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Personal Reminiscences or search for Personal Reminiscences in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
al of historic value, and is a highly prized addition to our library. Books received. We acknowledge the receipt of the following books, which will be noticed more fully hereafter: From D. Appleton & Co., New York: Cooke's Life of General R. E. Lee. A military biography of Stonewall Jackson. By Colonel John Esten Cooke. With an appendix (containing an account of the Inauguration of Foley's statue, &c.), by Rev. J. Wm. Jones. General Joseph E. Johnston's Narrative. Personal Reminiscences, Anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee. By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. Sherman's Memoirs and Shuckers' Life of Chief justice Chase. From the publishers, Harper Brothers, New York (through West & Johnston, Richmond): Draper's Civil war in America. From J. B. Lippincott, Philadelphia (through West & Johnston): Dixon's New America. From West & Johnston, Richmond: A beautiful lithograph of the Ordinance of Secession of Virginia, and the signatures of the members of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
The book is gotten up in the highest style of the printer's art, the engravings add to its attractiveness, and we hear it is meeting with a large sale. It is to be regretted that the publishers did not give Colonel Cooke the opportunity of revising and correcting his work, for while the book is very readable, and gives some exceedingly vivid pictures of old Stonewall on his rawbone sorrel, there are important errors in the narrative which ought by all means to be corrected. Personal Reminiscences. Anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee. By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, D. D. D. Appleton & Co., New York. We cannot, of course, give an unbiased judgment of this book. But we may say this, that the letters of General Lee, which the author was so fortunate as to secure, are among the most charming specimens of letter-writing in all the wide range of Literature, and that the view of his private, domestic, and Christian character thus given presents him to the world as one of the noble
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of General Lee's army in the Seven days battles around Richmond. (search)
iments of esteem you express, and I am sure that, if among us, he would frown most indignantly upon any effort to enhance his own reputation at the expense of yourself or any one else. I beg, General, that you will not regard me as one who has officiously volunteered in a dispute in which he has no interest. Having, in an address delivered at Lexington on the 19th of January, 1872, undertaken to establish what was the strength of our army around Richmond in June, 1862, and Mr. Jones having done me the honor of promulgating that address to the world (in his Personal Reminiscences of General Lee), I have felt that it was incumbent on me to vindicate the correctness of my estimates, which are so much at variance with your own. In doing so I have intended to be entirely respectful and courteous to you, and I trust you will so understand me. With the assurance of my highest esteem, I am, very respectfully and truly, your obedient servant, J. A. Early. General Joseph E. Johnston.