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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Personal Reminiscences or search for Personal Reminiscences in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The old Texas brigade, [from the Richmond times, September 22, 1891.] (search)
er's old field on the turnpike and Tapp's old field on the Orange plank-road, the site of the memorial stone just erected, are about five miles apart, and were the centres of heaviest fighting in the battle of the Wilderness. Heroism and devotion to Lee. In commemoration of their heroism and devotion to General Lee shown by the Texas brigade this stone was erected. The scene, the memory of which we would thus perpetuate, is graphically described by Rev. J. William Jones in his Personal Reminiscences of General R. E. Lee. It was a crisis in the battle when Longstreet's corps first came upon the field, headed by the Texas brigade, led by the gallant Gregg. General Lee rode to meet them, and was advancing as their leader in the charge. The soldiers perceiving this shouted: Go back, General Lee. Do go back. General Lee to the rear! A ragged veteran stepped from the ranks and seized his bridle-rein. The command refused to advance until their beloved chieftain had retired. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
Stonewall Jackson. [from the Richmond times, July 19, 21, 22, 1891.] Personal Reminiscences and anecdotes of his Character—Recollections of him by Dr. J. William Jones, formerly chaplain of the army of Northern Virginia. The unveiling of Valentine's statue of Stonewall Jackson, the gathering of the veterans of the old Foot Cavalry to gaze on the lifelike presentment of their old commander which the genius of our great artist has given to the world, the-reunion of old comrades, and the recalling of a thousand hallowed memories of the camp, the march, the bivouac, and the battlefield, will excite fresh and wide interest in all that pertains to the career of the great soldier who filled two continents with his fame. The distinguished orator of the day, General J. A. Early, will doubtless make an able and exhaustive presentation of the military career of his chief, whom he so bravely followed in his great campaigns, and whose name and fame he is so capable of delineating and