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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Personal Reminiscences or search for Personal Reminiscences in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
back Sheridan, and Ord's Infantry came up to his support, and it was seen that surrender was inevitable, General Fitz escaped with his cavalry towards Lynchburg, but becoming convinced that the war was virtually over, he rode to Farmville, and reported to General Meade, who advised him to return to Appomattox and be paroled. This he did and became the guest of General John Gibbon of the United States Army, under whom he had been at West Point, and whose family he knew well. In his Personal Reminiscences of Appomattox, General Gibbon says: That night Fitz, lying on the floor, slept as soundly as a child after, he said, having had no sleep for a week. Nothing could dampen his high spirits. With grim humor, he took from his pocket a $5 Confederate note and writing across its face, For Mrs. Gibbon, with the compliments of Fitz Lee, he said: Send that to your wife and tell her it's the last cent I have in the world. His was no hard, ascetic temper, which substituted harshness
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The surrender of Gen. R. E. Lee. (search)
le in the South. The account of the ceremonies attending the return of the flag of the Eighth Texas Cavalry, in the Veteran of December, 1899, reports Governor Sayers as saying: And finally Appomattox came and General Lee surrendered; the great, heroic, magnanimous Grant refuses to take his sword. Colonel Charles Marshall, who was, I believe, the only officer accompanying General Lee on the occasion, has disclaimed that anything of the kind occurred. Dr. J. William Jones, in Personal Reminiscences of General Robert E. Lee, at page 303, reports General Lee as making a similar statement during a conversation with a company of friends, as follows: General Grant returned your sword, did he not? asked one of the company. The old hero straightened himself up and replied: No, sir, he did not. I was determined that the side-arms of officers should be exempt by the terms of the surrender, and, of course, I did not offer him mine. All that was said about swords was that Gener