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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 28 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 27 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 15 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for W. B. Renshaw or search for W. B. Renshaw in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
lot Town. I do not hesitate to say, but for the exertions of Commander Renshaw, Lieutenant-Commander Baldwin, and Lieutenant-Commander Wainw cannot be awarded to the commanders of the Westfield and Clifton (Renshaw and Baldwin), for the exertions they displayed on this occasion; tet Lane, Lieutenant-Commander Wainwright, leading; Westfield, Commander Renshaw; Owasco, Lieutenant-Commander Guest; Clifton, Lieutenant-Commommand during this arduous and sometimes unpleasant service. Commander Renshaw, Lieutenant-Commander Guest, Lieutenant-Commander Wainwright,, which they did with effect, until the time came to retire. Commander Renshaw made his rifle gun tell with effect, keeping his vessel in cls on the right bank of the river, supported by the Westfield, Commander Renshaw. The surveyors were landed at the point desired, in the Owas notice of their conduct as this great occasion merits. To Commander Renshaw, Lieutenants-Commanding Guest, Bald win, Wainwright, and Wood
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
t Surgeon. Flag-officer D. G. Farragut, Commanding Western Division Gulf Blockading Squadron. United States Steam-Sloop Oneida, below Vicksburg, July 16, 1862. Sir — I make the following report of the action with the batteries and with the rebel iron-clad ram Arkansas, last evening, in passing Vicksburg. At 6.40 P. M., flag-ship made general signal 1,218; got under way, steaming as necessary, whilst the fleet was formed according to the plan for the morning of the 28th ultimo. Renshaw's mortars were now firing at the batteries. At 6.55, the army mortars commenced firing; at 7, the Benton opened fire on the new upper battery; at 7.20, passed two of the army gun-boats — now holding their fire to allow us to pass — our fleet having formed and closed up; at 7.30, we opened fire on the new upper battery; fired, in passing, at the upper batteries and rifle-pits with our battery and small arms, whilst under like fire from the rebels. We passed near the left (east) bank, sto<
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
capture of Galveston by the Confederates. destruction of the Westfield. Commander Renshaw and a portion of his crew blown up. the steamer Harriet Lane captured byemployed at the siege of Port Hudson with good effect. On October 6th, Commander Renshaw reported to Rear-Admiral Farragut that with the above named vessels he haorite resorts of blockade runners. It was at once garrisoned by the Army, and Renshaw's vessels took positions in the several entrances of the arbor to prevent the . The Confederates seeing her helpless condition sent a flag of truce to Commander Renshaw, to inform him that if he would surrender his command he would be allowednfederates had posted their steamers and batteries for a renewed attack. Commander Renshaw got all his men into the boats and sent them off, remaining with his own y did, but the flames spread so rapidly that they reached the magazine just as Renshaw entered his boat, and he, with Lieutenant Zimmerman, Chief Engineer Green, and