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private enterprise was called in to supplement the need. As one illustration, Grover & Baker of Roxbury turned their extensive sewing-machine workshop into a rifle-manufactory, which employed several hundred hands, and this was only one of a large number in that section. Alger, of South Boston, poured the immense molten masses of his cupolas into the moulds of cannon, and his massive steam-hammers pounded out and welded the ponderous shafts of gunboats and monitors. The descendants of Paul Revere diverted a part of their yellow metal from the mills which rolled it into sheathing for government ships, to the founding of brass twelve-pounders, or Napoleons, as they were called; and many a Rebel was laid low by shrapnel or canister hurled through the muzzle of guns on which was plainly stamped Revere Copper Co., Canton, Mass. Plain smooth-bore Springfield muskets soon became Springfield rifles, and directly the process of rifling was applied to cannon of various calibres. Then, muzz
1st) Brigade, Gibbon's (2d) Division, and fought in all the subsequent battles of the Second Corps. Twentieth Massachusetts Infantry. Hall's Brigade — Gibbon's Division--Second Corps. (1) Col. William R. Lee; Bvt. Brig. Gen. (3) Col. Paul Revere (Killed); Bvt. Brig. Gen. (2) Col. Francis W. Palfrey; Bvt. Brig. Gen. (4) Col. George N. Macy; Bvt. Major-Gen. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Tott action. The Twentieth sustained the greatest loss in battle of any Massachusetts regiment; also, a remarkable fatality in its Field and Staff, losing a Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel, two Majors, an Adjutant, and a Surgeon, killed in battle. Colonel Revere was mortally wounded at Gettysburg; Lieutenant-Colonel Ferdinand Dreher received a fatal wound at Fredericksburg; Major Henry L. Abbott was killed at the Wilderness; Major Henry L. Patton died of wounds received at Deep Bottom; and Surgeon
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
scovered that a Rebel regiment of horse had coolly camped there during the night, and were now engaged with our cavalry, who soon drove them away. Pretty soon the sound of cannon, in the direction of Auburn, announced that the Rebels, marching down from Warrenton, had attacked General Warren's rear. He, however, held them in check easily with one division, while the other two marched along, passing our Headquarters at 9.30 A. M. As they went on, I recognized the Massachusetts 20th, poor Paul Revere's regiment. And so we jogged, General Meade (who has many a little streak of gunpowder in his disposition) continually bursting out against his great bugbear, the waggons; and sending me, at full gallop, after General Sykes, who was a hundred miles, or so, ahead, to tell him that the rear of his ambulance train was quite unprotected. . . . The 15th was employed in feeling the intentions of the enemy and resting the exhausted men. On the 16th came on a deluge of rain which spoiled our con
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Samuel, 1722-1803 (search)
The vigilant Warren, learning the secret of the expedition, sent Paul Revere to warn the patriots of their danger. Revere waited at CharlestRevere waited at Charlestown for a signal-light from the sexton of the North Church, to warn him of the forward movement of the troops. It was given, and on Deacon Larkin's swift horse Revere sped to Lexington. At a little past midnight he rode up to Clarke's house. which he found guarded by Sergeant Monr not to allow them to be disturbed by any noise. Noise! exclaimed Revere; you'll have noise enough before long; the regulars are coming outllowed to knock at the door. Mr. Clarke appeared at a window, when Revere said, I wish to see Mr. Hancock. I do not like to admit strangers ight, answered Mr. Clarke. Hancock, who was not asleep, recognized Revere's voice, and called out. Come in, Revere, we are not afraid of you.Revere, we are not afraid of you. The warning was given; the whole household was soon astir, and the two patriots awaited the coming of the enemy. When they approached, the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Currency, Continental (search)
00 bills of 20 dollars each236,000 ———————— Total, 403,800$2,000,000 Resolved, that the form of the bill be as follows: Continental currency. No.— —Dollars. This Bill entitles the Bearer to receive —Spanish milled Dollars, or the value thereof in Gold or Silver, according to the resolutions of the Congress, held at Philadelphia the 10th of May, A. D. 1775. A committee was appointed to procure the plates and superintend the printing of the bills. The plates were engraved by Paul Revere, of Boston. The paper was so thick that the British called it the pasteboard currency of the rebels. The size of the bills averaged about 3 1/2 by 2 3/4 inches, having a border composed partly of repetitions of the words Continental currency. On the face of each bill was a device (a separate one for each denomination) significant in design and legend; for example, within a circle a design representing a hand planting a tree, and the legend Posteritate—for posterity.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dawes, William, (search)
Dawes, William, Patriot. On April 18, 1775, he accompanied Paul Revere, riding through Roxbury, while Revere went by way of Charlestown. On the following day, when Adams and Hancock received the message from Warren, Revere, Dawes, and Samuel PRevere went by way of Charlestown. On the following day, when Adams and Hancock received the message from Warren, Revere, Dawes, and Samuel Prescott rode forward, arousing the inhabitants. They were surprised by a number of British at Lincoln, and both Dawes and Revere were captured, Prescott making good his escape to Concord. received the message from Warren, Revere, Dawes, and Samuel Prescott rode forward, arousing the inhabitants. They were surprised by a number of British at Lincoln, and both Dawes and Revere were captured, Prescott making good his escape to Concord. received the message from Warren, Revere, Dawes, and Samuel Prescott rode forward, arousing the inhabitants. They were surprised by a number of British at Lincoln, and both Dawes and Revere were captured, Prescott making good his escape to Concord.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fine Arts, the. (search)
museums, and art exhibitions has quite generally dissipated prudery. Crawford gave to American sculpture a fame that widened that of Greenough and Powers. Music has had a habitation here, first in the form of psalm-singing, from the earliest settlements. Now its excellent professors and practitioners are legion in number. The graphic art in our country is only a little more than a century old. Nathaniel Hurd, of Boston, engraved on copper portraits and caricatures as early as 1762. Paul Revere, also, engraved at the period of the Revolution. He engraved the plates for the Continental money. Amos Doolittle was one of the earliest of our better engravers on copper. Dr. Alexander Anderson (q. v.) was the first man who engraved on wood in this country—an art now brought to the highest perfection here. The earliest and best engraver on steel was Asher B. Durand (q. v.), who became one of the first lineengravers in the world, but abandoned the profession for the art of painting
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Goss, Elbridge Henry 1830- (search)
Goss, Elbridge Henry 1830- Author; born in Boston, Mass., Dec. 22, 1830; received a common-school education. His publications include Early bells of Massachusetts; Centennial fourth address; Life of Col. Paul Revere; History of Melrose, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battle of Lexington and Concord. (search)
observed with concern the gathering of munitions of war by the colonists. Informed that a considerable quantity had been deposited at Concord, a village about 16 miles from Boston, he planned a secret expedition to seize or destroy them. Towards midnight, on April 18, he sent 800 men, under Lieutenant-Colonel Smith and Major Pitcairn, to execute his designs. The vigilant patriots had discovered the secret, and were on the alert, and when the expedition moved to cross the Charles River, Paul Revere, one of the most active of the Sons of Liberty in Boston, had preceded them, and was on his way towards Concord to arouse the inhabitants and the minute-men. Soon afterwards church bells, musketry, and cannon spread the alarm over the country; and when, at dawn, April 19, Pitcairn, with the advanced guard, reached Lexington, a little village 6 miles from Concord, he found seventy determined men, under Capt. Jonas Parker, drawn up on the green to oppose him. Pitcairn rode forward and shou
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Revere, Joseph Warren 1812-1880 (search)
Revere, Joseph Warren 1812-1880 Grandson of Paul Revere; born in Boston, May 17, 1812; was an officer in the United States navy, 1828-50. During the Civil War he became colonel of a New Jersey regiment, and was promoted brigadier-general in 1862. He was court-martialled in 1863, but the sentence was revoked by President Lincoln in 1864. Revere retired to private life in 1864, and died in Hoboken, N. J., April 20, 1880. Revere, Joseph Warren 1812-1880 Grandson of Paul Revere; born in Boston, May 17, 1812; was an officer in the United States navy, 1828-50. During the Civil War he became colonel of a New Jersey regiment, and was promoted brigadier-general in 1862. He was court-martialled in 1863, but the sentence was revoked by President Lincoln in 1864. Revere retired to private life in 1864, and died in Hoboken, N. J., April 20, 1880.
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