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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 28 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Edinburgh Review or search for Edinburgh Review in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
t caution. He spoke of Inchiquin's letters and the reply to them, but gave no opinion as to the truth or merits of either; and of Jeffrey, the editor of the Edinburgh Review, whose name, when he had mentioned it, seemed to strike him with a sudden silence. I promise you I was careful in my replies, and did not suffer him to knowsuaded that other people were the objects of greater kindness than they merit. . . . . I had seriously intended to send you a sketch of the Abraham of the Edinburgh Review, while I was running over with speculations and opinions about him; and as you seem to regret that I did not, and as it is impossible to hear too much about nters a room with a countenance so satisfied, and a step so light and almost fantastic, that all your previous impressions of the dignity and severity of the Edinburgh Review are immediately put to flight, and, passing at once to the opposite extreme, you might, perhaps, imagine him to be frivolous, vain, and supercilious. He acc
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
also saw him several times, he is mild, gentle, and entertaining. But he is seen to greatest advantage, and in all his strength, only in serious discussion, to which he brings great disciplined acuteness and a fluent eloquence, which few may venture to oppose, and which still fewer can effectually resist. Allen, who is a kind of secretary to Lord Holland, and has lived in his family many years, is a different man. He has a great deal of talent, and has written much and well, in the Edinburgh Review; he has strong feelings and great independence of character, which make him sometimes oppose and answer Lady Holland in a curious manner. He has many prejudices, most of them subdued with difficulty, by his weight of talent and his strong will, but many still remaining, and, finally, warm, sincere feelings, and an earnest desire to serve those he likes. Sir James Mackintosh said of him to me, that, considering the extent of his knowledge, he had never known anybody in whom it was so a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
orld. We dined with my friend Kenyon In another passage of the Journal Mr. Ticknor says: Mr. Kenyon is a man of fortune and literary tastes and pursuits, about fifty years old, whom I knew on the Continent in 1817. He has travelled a great deal, and though a shy man and mixing little in general society, is a man of most agreeable and various resources. Three or four years ago he printed, without his name, a volume called A rhymed Plea for Tolerance, which was much praised in the Edinburgh Review, and contains certainly much poetical feeling, and a most condensed mass of thought. very agreeably, meeting Mr. Robinson, Henry Crabbe Robinson. a great friend of Wordsworth, and a man famous for conversation; Mr. Harness, a popular and fashionable preacher, who has lately edited one of the small editions of Shakespeare very well; and five or six other very pleasant men. It was a genuinely English dinner, in good taste, with all the elegance of wealth, and with the intellectual refi