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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 AtlixcoOct. 18, 1847 Civil War. Fort Sumter (Evacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)JulMesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 AtlixcoOct. 18, 1847 Civil War. Fort Sumter (Evacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)Jul
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bomford, James V., -1892 (search)
Bomford, James V., -1892 Military officer; born on Governor's Island, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1811; son of George Bomford; was graduated at West Point in 1832; brevetted major for gallantry at Contreras and lieutenant-colonel for meritorious conduct at the battle of Molino del Rey. While on frontier duty in Texas, at the beginning of the Civil War, he was made a prisoner and was not exchanged until 1862, when he was promoted lieutenant-colonel. He was brevetted colonel for gallantry at Perryville, and was retired in 1872. He died in Elizabeth. N. J., Jan. 6, 1892.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cadwalader, George 1804-1879 (search)
Cadwalader, George 1804-1879 Military officer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1804; practised law there till 1846; served in the Mexican War; was present at the battles of Molino del Rey and Chapultepec; and for bravery in the latter was brevetted major-general. He resumed law practice in Philadelphia at the close of hostilities. In 1861, he was appointed major-general of Pennsylvania volunteers, and placed in command of Baltimore when a local revolt against the government was threatened, and in April, 1862, was commissioned major-general of United States volunteers. In the latter year he was made a member of a board appointed to revise the military laws and regulations of the United States. He published Services in the Mexican campaign. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 3, 1879.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chapultepec, battle of (search)
Chapultepec, battle of The city of Mexico stands on a slight swell of ground, near the centre of an irregular basin, and encircled by a broad and deep navigable canal. The approaches to the city are over elevated causeways, flanked by ditches. From these the capital is entered by arched gateways; and these, when the victorious Americans approached the city (August, 1847), were strongly fortified. When El Molino del Rey and Casa de Mata had been captured (Sept. 8, 1847), the castle of Chapultepec alone remained as a defence for the city—this and its outworks. The hill, steep and rocky, rises 150 feet above the surrounding country. The castle was built of heavy stone masonry. The whole fortress was 900 feet in length, and the terreplein and main buildings 600 feet. The castle was about 10 feet in height, and presented a splendid specimen of military architecture. A dome, rising about 20 feet above the walls, gave it a grand appearance. Two strongly built walls surrounded th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), El Caney, (search)
ed with the lines steadily closing in. So stubborn, however, was the defence that reinforcements under Maj.-Gen. John C. Bates were ordered up to strengthen the line, which had been considerably weakened in the desperate assaults. After the enemy had left their intrenchments, the fire was concentrated upon the brick fort, from which the Spaniards poured a galling musketry fire into the American lines. The fort could not long withstand the attack, and rents were soon torn in its thick walls. At this juncture the commands under Chaffee, Bates, and Miles made a charge, and captured the work, but not until all the men defending it were killed or wounded. After its capture the smaller block-houses ceased fighting, with the exception of one which was soon destroyed by a few shots of Capron's battery. The brave defence of El Caney was directed by Brig.-Gen. Vera de Rey (who died fighting), with 520 men, of whom scarcely a fifth remained alive at the end of the action. See San Juan Hill.