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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), El Molino del Rey, capture of. (search)
El Molino del Rey, capture of. Almost within cannon-shot distance of the city of Mexico is Chapultepec, a hill composed of porphyritic walls, and towers at the end, known as El Battle of El Molino Del Rey. Molino del Rey— The King's Mill. About 400 yards from this was aRey— The King's Mill. About 400 yards from this was another massive stone building, known as Casa de Mata. The former was used (1847) as a cannon foundry by the Mexicans, and the latter was a dhose sources of strength. He proposed to first attack El Molino del Rey, which was commanded by General Leon. The Mexican forces at these ds were about 14,000 strong, their left wing resting on El Molino del Rey, their centre forming a connecting line with Casa de Mata and suppor battle began at dawn by Huger's 24-pounder opening on El Molino del Rey, when Major Wright, of the 8th Infantry, fell upon the centre with 5ained their position, and a terrible struggle ensued. El Molino del Rey was soon assailed and carried by Garland's brigade, and at the same
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mexico, War with (search)
rom Santa Ana to ask for an armistice, preparatory to negotiations for peace. It was granted. Nicholas P. Trist (q. v.), appointed by the United States government to treat for peace, was present. The treacherous Santa Ana had made this only a pretext to gain time to strengthen the defences of the city. When the trick was discovered, Scott declared the armistice at an end, and advanced upon the city. Less than 4,000 Americans attacked Santa Ana with 14,000 Mexicans, Sept. 8, at Molino del Rey (the King's Mill), near Chapultepec. The combatants fought desperately and suffered dreadfully. The Mexicans left almost 1,000 dead on the field; the Americans lost 800. The lofty battlemented hill of Chapultepec was doomed. It was the last place to be defended outside of the city. It was attacked by mortar and cannon shells and round-shot, Sept. 12, and the assault continued until the next day, when the American flag waved in triumph over its shattered castle. The Mexicans fled into th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Molino del Rey. (search)
Molino del Rey. See El Molino Del Rey.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nichols, William Augustus 1818-1869 (search)
Nichols, William Augustus 1818-1869 Military officer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., May 12, 1818; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1838. During the war with Mexico he was aide to General Quitman and assistant adjutant-general under General Garland; and was brevetted major in recognition of gallantry at Molino del Rey. He served through the Civil War, and received the brevet of major-general in 1865. Later he was appointed chief of staff and adjutant-general of the department of Missouri. He died in St. Louis, Mo., April 8, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stone, Charles Pomeroy 1824-1887 (search)
Stone, Charles Pomeroy 1824-1887 Military officer; born in Greenfield, Mass., Sept. 30, 1824; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1845; served in the Mexican War, and was promoted captain for gallantry in the battle of Molino del Rey. When the Civil War broke out he was appointed colonel of the 14th United States Infantry, and placed in command of the outposts and defences of Washington. On Oct. 20, 1861, he was ordered by General McClellan to closely watch the movements of the enemy and make a feint of crossing the Potomac at Ball's Bluff. After obeying these orders it seems that he supposed the enemy might be surprised, and with that object in view crossed the Potomac in the night. On Oct. 21 he was attacked and defeated, with heavy loss. General Stone remained in his command till Feb. 9, 1862, when he was arrested and confined in Fort Lafayette in New York Harbor till Aug. 16. He was then released, as no charge had been made against him. Immediately after
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
m Vera Cruz towards the city of Mexico under General Twiggs......April 8, 1847 Battle of Cerro Gordo......April 18, 1847 Army enters Puebla......May 15, 1847 President Polk visits the Eastern States as far as Augusta, Me., and returns to Washington......July 7, 1847 Battles of Contreras and Churubusco......Aug. 20, 1847 Armistice granted the Mexicans by General Scott......from Aug. 21 to Sept. 7, 1847 Salt Lake City founded by the Mormons......1847 Battle of El Molino del Rey ( The King's Mill )......Sept. 8, 1847 Fortress of Chapultepec carried by storm, and the city of Mexico occupied by the United States troops. Sept. 13, 1847 Gen. Zachary Taylor returns to the United States......November, 1847 Thirtieth Congress, first session, assembles......Dec. 6, 1847 By resolution Congress authorizes the erection on public grounds in Washington of a monument to George Washington......Jan. 31, 1848 Treaty of peace, friendship, limits, claims, etc., between t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Walker, William H. T. 1816- (search)
Walker, William H. T. 1816- Military officer; born in Georgia in October, 1816; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1837; was assigned to Florida, where he was thrice wounded during the battle of Okeechobee, Dec. 25, 1837; promoted captain in 1845; took part in all of the important battles of the Mexican War, winning distinction at Contreras, Churubusco, and Molino del Rey; was brevetted lieutenant-colonel; and was instructor of military tactics and commandant of cadets at the United States Military Academy in 1854-56. He joined the Confederate army in 1861; was made major-general, and served chiefly in the West. He was killed in the battle of Decatur, Ga., July 26, 1864.