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, but was in echelon, and slightly in rear of Reynolds's right. By this unfortunate mistake a gap we road. Brannan's division reached Trenton. Reynolds remained in camp at that place. Corps headqu joined by Wilder at that place. Turchin, of Reynolds's division, made a reconnoissance to the moutin time to defeat the enemy's efforts to turn Reynolds's right and rear. About five P. M., my lines of Brannan's division, nearly in the rear of Reynolds's right. At the same time the assault just commanding my escort, was sent to notify General Reynolds to commence the movement, and I left the for the day. Had the enemy, after penetrating Reynolds's line, followed with proper force the movemeer from General Rosecrans to close well up on Reynolds, and support him. Wood's skirmishers were alre, restored the line. In front of Palmer and Reynolds the enemy made furious attempts to force his t ran nearly at right angles with the line of Reynolds, Palmer, etc. Through the wooded interval bet[65 more...]
the guns of Fort Pillow. I have to call the especial attention of the Department to the gallantry and good conduct exhibited by Commanders Stembel and Kilty, and Lieut. Commanding S. L. Phelps. I regret to say that Commander Stembel, Fourth Master Reynolds, and one of the seamen of the Cincinnati and one of the Mound City were severely wounded. The other accidents of the day were slight. I have the honor to be, Your most obedient servant, C. H. Davis, Captain Commanding Mississippi The Cincinnati was injured on her starboard bow and sunk in twelve feet of water. She will be raised and sent here for repairs, which will be done with all possible despatch. Commander Stembel is here at the Naval Depot, doing well. Fourth Master Reynolds of the Cincinnati was mortally wounded. Two of the Cincinnati's crew were slightly wounded. There were no other casualties. Commander Stembel fought his ship gallantly. (Signed) A. W. Pennock, Commanding and Fleet Captain. Chic
cavalry from Winchester. On the twenty-seventh other troops arrived, with Capt. Crounse's and Reynolds's battery of the First New-York artillery. I occupied Bolivar Heights with my troops, and Maia regiment, Col. Schlandecker, and the First Maryland cavalry, Major Deems, and one section of Reynolds's battery. Our cavalry drove the rebels out of Charlestown, but they were immediately reenforcnd eight men captured by the enemy. The Seventy-eighth New-York, and the remaining pieces of Reynolds's battery, were at once despatched to cover their retreat, which was effected in good order, wivening, in the storm. Gen. Slough opened upon them from Camp Hill with Crounse's and part of Reynolds's battery, and Lieut. Daniels, from battery Stanton, on Maryland Heights. The scene at this ti. Also, to Col. D. S. Miles, commanding the railroad brigade, and his aids, Lieuts. Binney and Reynolds, as well as to my own personal staff, Capt. George Merrill, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. J
crup, Co. F, Lynn, killed; Private Geo. H. Baxter, Co. F, Newtown, Mass., killed; Private Austin Gill, Co. K, killed; Wm. H. Moore, Captain of Gun, Marine Artillery, Chicago, Ill., killed; Lieut. Horatio Jarves, Co. A, wounded by ball through left ankle-joint; Capt. W. F. Redding, Co. A, wrist, slight; Private James A. Beal, Co. B, forehead, slight; Private Joseph A. Collins, Co. E, temple; Private John. Vaughn, Co. E, hip, severely; Private M. J. O'Brien, Co. I, bayonet wound; Private Wm. Reynolds, Co. I, shoulder, slight; Private G. A. Howard, Co. I, hand, slight; Private Jas. Gibbon, marine artillery, flesh-wound, leg; Private William A. Clark, marine artillery, spent ball; Private Albert Gibbs, marine artillery, neck and shoulder. Another account. Washington, N. C., June 7, 1862. During last week and the early part of the present, we were frequently annoyed by scouting parties of the rebels, who came within a short distance of the town and continually threatened it. Ind
y. At about noon a powerful corps of the enemy, consisting of Gen. A. P. Hill's, D. H. Hill's, Longstreet's, and Anderson's divisions--then supposed to be Jackson's force--under command of Major-General Robert E. Lee, crossed the river at Mechanicsville bridge, Meadow bridge, and at Atlee's, and between one and two o'clock attacked our flank. Two regiments of Meade's brigade (McCall's division) were in reserve, and one on picket-duty. They did not at any time fully engage the enemy. General Reynolds's brigade held the right, and Seymour's the left. The fight was opened with artillery, at long range, but the enemy, finally discovering our superiority in this arm, foreshortened the range, and came into close conflict. He was evidently provoked at his own inefficiency, since his shell were not destructive in our intrenchments, while our gunners played upon his exposed ranks with fearful effect. The fight seemed to increase in fury as it progressed, and it finally became the most te
er, neck; Corporal John Coleman, leg; Corporal James Reynolds, hand; Corporal H. Brokamp, arm; privmen of the Pennsylvania reserves, under Brig.-Gen. Reynolds, who had arrived at Kelly's Ford, and tached the Pennsylvania reserves, under Brig.-General Reynolds, the first of the army of the Potomac ive thousand men; McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, fifteen thousand five hundred menis own corps and Sigel's, and the division of Reynolds, so as to reach that point during the night. rce was so disposed that McDowell, Sigel, and Reynolds, whose joint forces amounted to about twenty- in the nighborhood of Groveton, supported by Reynolds's division to attack the enemy vigorously as at road. The extreme left was occupied by Gen. Reynolds. Gen. Reno's corps had reached the field, thers as follows: McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, twelve thousand men; Sigel's corpivisions of Gen. Schenck, Gen. Milroy, and Gen. Reynolds, who, shortly after the action began, were[2 more...]
n face; John Garner, A. Carnahan, killed; George A. Peet, dangerously wounded and missing; P. Brady, wounded in foot; Wm. Fischer, leg; H. S. Henneman, foot; J. Koltoff, head; P. Cramig, thigh; J. R. Lamb, leg, slightly; E. Myers, shoulder; T. S. Rice, arm and leg; T. Wright, hip, slightly. Company F--Lieut. James Kinkead, hand; Sergeant Jesse McLean, arm, (severe;) Sergeant James Carr, do.; Corporal Michael Boyle, leg; Corporal John Springmeyer, neck; Corporal John Coleman, leg; Corporal James Reynolds, hand; Corporal H. Brokamp, arm; privates, Reuben Daily, face; Charles Hinch, leg; Isaac Baum, wounded and missing; Charles Viner, hand; Richard Henniger, killed; privates, W. Drexillieus, killed; Henry Huier, killed; John Slossner, wounded in leg, (severe;) John McQuirk, do. Company G--Wounded: Lieut. C. F. McKenzie, arm; Sergeant Wilson Gregg, since died; Corporal C. B. Spennett, in leg; Thomas Mundy, in leg; W. F. Ransom, in wrist; R. Connolly, face, severe; Thomas Trustman, l
men of the Pennsylvania reserves, under Brig.-Gen. Reynolds, who had arrived at Kelly's Ford, and tached the Pennsylvania reserves, under Brig.-General Reynolds, the first of the army of the Potomac ive thousand men; McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, fifteen thousand five hundred menis own corps and Sigel's, and the division of Reynolds, so as to reach that point during the night. division,) Sigel's corps, and the division of Reynolds, marching in the direction of Centreville, enrce was so disposed that McDowell, Sigel, and Reynolds, whose joint forces amounted to about twenty- in the nighborhood of Groveton, supported by Reynolds's division to attack the enemy vigorously as at road. The extreme left was occupied by Gen. Reynolds. Gen. Reno's corps had reached the field, ivisions of Gen. Schenck, Gen. Milroy, and Gen. Reynolds, who, shortly after the action began, were was pushed forward into action in support of Reynolds's division, and was led forward in person by [1 more...]
000 feet of submerged wire; this was covered with cotton thread saturated with pitch and tar. Professor Morse is said to have laid a wire between New York and Governor's Island in 1842. In March, 1845, Brooman, in England, patented the method now universally employed for preparing gutta-percha; and in September of the same year Bewley patented a machine for making tubing, hose, etc., on the principle of Tatham's American machine for making lead pipe, patented in 1841. In 1846, Mr. James Reynolds, of New York, invented a machine for covering iron wire with india-rubber, and in 1848, by the aid of this machine, covered a wire with gutta-percha, which was laid between New York and Jersey City. Telegraphs of wire coated in this way were extensively introduced into Prussia in 1847-48, and in the latter year a guttapercha covered wire was laid across the Rhine at Cologne by Dr. Siemens. The first submarine cable ever laid in the open sea was laid between Dover, England, and Ca
Colonel Royston, Eighth Alabama, and after his severe wound, Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert, were intelligent, energetic and gallant in commanding, directing, and leading their men. He also speaks of the lamented Captain McCrary. (1056) Roll of honor, battle of Chancellorsville, May 1-4, 1863: Private Allen Bolling, Company A; Private J. N. Howard, Company B; Sergt. Robert Gaddes, Company C; Sergt. P. H. Mays, Company D; Sergt. T. A. Kelly, Company F; Private Patrick Leary, Company I; Private James Reynolds (killed), Company K. No. 44—(288) In Wilcox's brigade, Anderson's division, Third corps, army of Northern Virginia, at the battle of Gettysburg, July 1st to 3d. (332, 343) Casualties, 22 killed, 139 wounded. (620, 621) Mentioned in Gen. C. M. Wilcox's report. (775) Roll of honor, battle of Gettysburg: Sergts. Edmund Clark, Company A; Robert Gaddes, Company C; L. L. McCurdy, Company D; James R. Strickland, Company E; C. P. Ragsdale (color-bearer), Company F; Privates Z. Haynes,
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