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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 309 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 159 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 129 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 110 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 100 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 86 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 57 5 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 48 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 41 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 27 3 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
t this time consisted of the First Corps, General Reynolds; Second, General Hancock; Third, General . On June 30th, General Meade had sent General Reynolds, who commanded the left wing of our army,ng of the First and Eleventh Corps, under General Reynolds, arrived at Gettysburg, and there found Bn of cavalry already engaged with the enemy. Reynolds, with that quickness of perception, which wase as promptly as possible. . Then it was that Reynolds fell, the greatest soldier the Army of the Poustice to General Meade, between whom and General Reynolds existed a strong personal friendship, andicial report is proof that he appreciated General Reynolds' action on the first day at Gettysburg, a — to the direction of the wind, the sound of Reynolds' guns did not reach his headquarters, and he ion of our troops had met the enemy, and that Reynolds had fallen. General Meade at once sent Generision, July 1st, 1863-3.20 P. M. * * * General Reynolds was killed early this morning. In my opi
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Recollections of General Reynolds. (search)
eneral dividing line between the two armies. Reynolds' Corps occupied the long picket line on the rmmunication received about this time from General Reynolds, who was at this early period of the war up with the following communication from General Reynolds, dated at his headquarters, October 25th,mmander had no personal acquaintance with General Reynolds, not even to the extent of knowing him bybattle of Fredericksburg took place, in which Reynolds' Corps was a prominent actor, and was the onlnter, in the way of official duty, we met General Reynolds in his tent at corps headquarters. Our dr respect and confidence. The next we saw of Reynolds was at the great review of his corps in Aprilst heroes. Once again we remember seeing General Reynolds. It was when on the march to the world-rsays: On the night before the battle, General Reynolds retired to his room about midnight, and rhe whole army was shocked at the death of General Reynolds. His corps deeply felt his loss. This g[4 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 1: the Ante-bellum life of the author. (search)
ary field of Chantilly on the 1st of September, 1862. Next on the class roll was Henry Wager Halleck, who was commander-in-chief of the United States armies from July, 1862, to March, 1864. W. T. Sherman and George H. Thomas, of the Union army, and R. S. Ewell, of the Confederate army, were of the same class (1840). The class of 1841 had the largest list of officers killed in action. Irons, Ayers, Ernst, Gantt, Morris, and Burbank were killed in the Mexican War. N. Lyon, R. S. Garnett, J. F. Reynolds, R. B. Garnett, A. W. Whipple, J. M. Jones, I. B. Richardson, and J. P. Garesche fell on the fields of the late war. Of the class of 1842 few were killed in action, but several rose to distinguished positions,--Newton, Eustis, Rosecrans, Lovell, Van Dorn, Pope, Sykes, G. W. Smith, M. L. Smith, R. H. Anderson, L. McLaws, D. H. Hill, A. P. Stewart, B. S. Alexander, N. J. T. Dana, and others. But the class next after us (1843) was destined to furnish the man who was to eclipse all,-
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 10: fighting along the Chickahominy. (search)
n already given in general. The topographical features of the ground about Beaver Dam Creek have been given in a former chapter. Behind it battery epaulements had been skilfully laid and constructed, as well as rifle-trenches. These were occupied by the troops of the Fifth Corps, commanded by General Fitz-John Porter. McCall's division had joined the Army of the Potomac, and was assigned as part of the Fifth Corps, with the divisions of Sykes and Morell. Two of McCall's brigades, J. F. Reynolds's and Seymour's, with thoroughly-equipped artillery, were especially charged with the defences, the Third Brigade, Meade's, in reserve, the other divisions in supporting distance. McCall's advanced brigades had guards at the bridges as far as Meadow Bridge, and a strong outpost at Mechanicsville, under orders to retire when the strength of the enemy's advance was so developed as to warrant their doing so. Three batteries, two of six guns each and one of four, manned the epaulements
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 13: making ready for Manassas again. (search)
on the 24th. Meanwhile, General Pope had received the divisions of Kearny and Reynolds from McClellan's army, forty-five hundred and twenty-five hundred respectively gone astray by the mountains. He concentrated the Army of Virginia, to which Reynolds's division had been assigned, at and near Warrenton under McDowell; Reno east tation. Pope stood on the evening of the 27th: McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelnd following. General Pope ordered McDowell, with his own corps, including Reynolds's division and Sigel's corps, to march so as to be at Gainesville at nightfallout six o'clock McDowell put his troops on the countermarch, Sigel's corps and Reynolds's division back by the New Market road for its crossing of the Warrenton turnpd by Hooker. McDowell's operations of the afternoon left Sigel's corps and Reynolds's division in the vicinity of the field of King's fight. General Pope's order
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 14: Second battle of Manassas (Bull Run). (search)
ting Phil Kearny losses review of the campaign. General Pope at daylight sent orders to General Sigel's corps, with Reynolds's division, to attack as soon as it was light enough to see, and bring the enemy to a stand if possible. At the same ti division filed to the right from the turnpike, to reinforce the Federal right under Kearny, who, with Sigel's corps and Reynolds's division, were engaged in a desultory affair against Jackson's left, chiefly of artillery. R. H. Anderson's divisintreville were received at 3.15 P. M. Had they been promptly executed, the commands, King's division, Sigel's corps, and Reynolds's division, should have found Jackson by four o'clock. As it was, only the brigades of Gibbon and Doubleday were found pnset, when he advanced against them in battle. He reported it sanguinary. With the entire division of King and that of Reynolds, with Sigel's corps, it is possible that Pope's campaign would have brought other important results. On the 29th he was
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 21: reorganization and rest for both armies. (search)
n, made a radical change in the organization of the army by consolidating the corps into three Grand divisions as follows: the right Grand division, General Sumner Commanding.-Second Army Corps, General D. W. Couch; Ninth Army Corps, General O. B. Wilcox. centre Grand division, General Joseph Hooker Commanding. --Third Army Corps, General George Stonemall; Fifth Army Corps, General Daniel Butterfield. left Grand division, General W. B. Franklin Commanding. --First Army Corps, General J. F. Reynolds; Sixth Army Corps, General W. F. Smith. cavalry division.--General Alfred Pleasonton. Artillery, siege, and field batteries, 370 guns, General Henry J. Hunt, Chief. At the time of the change of commanders the Confederates were looking for a Federal move north of Culpeper Court-House, and were surveying the ground behind Robertson River for a point of concentration of the two wings to meet that move. General Burnside, however, promptly planned operations on other lines. H
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 26: Gettysburg-First day. (search)
enerals Ewell and A. P. Hill engage the Federals death of General John F. Reynolds the fight on Seminary Ridge General Hancock in Federal c till it passed Willoughby's Run. On the 30th of June, General John F. Reynolds had been directed to resume command of the right wing of ters pointed to Pipe Creek as the probable line in case of battle. Reynolds, however, prepared to support Buford's line of cavalry, and marcheoubleday, who became commander of the corps upon the assignment of Reynolds to command of the wing. As Reynolds approached Gettysburg, in Reynolds approached Gettysburg, in hearing of the cavalry fight, he turned the head of his column to the left and marched through the fields towards the engagement. As the cavanfederate infantry got in so close along the railroad cut that General Reynolds, in efforts to extricate his right, was shot, when the right, ired. Doubleday's other divisions came up about the moment General Reynolds was killed. The Second (Robinson's) and Third (Rowley's) Divi
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
Benham:--15th N. Y. (3 cos.), Maj. Walter L. Cassin; 50th N. Y., Col. William H. Pettes; U. S. Battn., Capt. George H. Mendell. First Army Corps, Major-General John F. Reynolds, of this Corps, was killed July 1, while in command of the left wing of the Army; General Doubleday commanded the Corps July 1, and General Newton, whY., Col. Daniel D. Bidwell; 77th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Winsor B. French; 61st Pa., Lieut.-Col. George F. Smith. Third division, Maj.-Gen. John Newton,Major-General John F. Reynolds, of this corps, was killed July 1, while in command of the left wing of the army; General Doubleday commanded the corps July 1, and General Newton, whiston; 2d U. S., Batt. G, Lieut. John H. Butler; 5th U. S., Batt. F, Lieut. Leonard Martin. Eleventh Army Corps, during the interval between the death of General Reynolds and the arrival of General Hancock, on the afternoon of July 1, all the troops on the field of battle were commanded by General Howard, General Schurz taking
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 30: Longstreet moves to Georgia. (search)
tween the enemy and Chattanooga open and free of obstructions or troops to defend it. On the right of Breckenridge's division was Armstrong's division of cavalry dismounted, and beyond his right was Forrest's other division of cavalry, Pegram's. Some miles off from our left was Wheeler's division of cavalry, under Wharton and Martin. The Union army from left to right was: first the Fourteenth Corps, General George H. Thomas commanding, four divisions,--Baird's division on the left, then Reynolds's and Brannan's, the latter retired to position of reserve, and Negley's. (The last named had been left, on the night of the 19th, on guard near the Glen House, but was ordered early on the 20th to join General Thomas, and one of the brigades did move promptly under the order; the other brigades (two) failed to receive the order.) Then the Twentieth Corps, three divisions,--Jefferson C. Davis's, R. W. Johnson's, and P. H. Sheridan's,--on the right, General A. McD. McCook commanding the co
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