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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 80 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 75 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 74 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 43 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 23 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1863., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Reynolds or search for Reynolds in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's campaign in Kentucky in 1862. (search)
Bragg, who had begun his advance against Buell, from Chattanooga, with 25,000 men, feared the movement was premature; but General Smith, with the enterprise and audacity so essential, and generally so successful, in offensive warfare, adopted it, and prepared rapidly for its accomplishment. One division was sent to Manchester and the other to London. Brigadier-General Leadbetter, of Heth's division, was stationed at Cumberland Ford, while Heth himself was to remain at Barboursville until Reynolds' brigade, three thousand strong, which had been ordered from Stevenson's command across Big Creek Gap, could join him. It was necessary to delay the advance until the artillery and wagon trains came up. In the meantime the soldiers subsisted on beef and roasting ears. Scott had captured some sutlers stores and a large number of wagons at London. On the 23d he attacked Metcalfe's cavalry and Garritts' infantry at Big Hill, and defeated them with severe loss. On the morning of the 27th of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign of Chancellorsville — by Theodore A. Dodge, United States army. (search)
Stuart's attack, and most gallantly holds the ground for a a time, but is finally driven from his position, as is Slocum, who joins him on the left. Hooker permits the centre of his army to be beaten, while the wings are practically unengaged. Reynolds, with the First corps, had been brought up from Fredericksburg on Saturday, thus making over 90,000 troops in all that had been concentrated at Chancel-lorsville. But Reynolds and Meade, with the First and Fifth corps, are allowed to remain idlReynolds and Meade, with the First and Fifth corps, are allowed to remain idle on Sickles's right while he is being defeated; and on the left wing of the army, the Eleventh and part of the Second corps have no enemy in front. Thus more than half of the force that Hooker had at hand did little or nothing towards resisting Lee's onset. Meantime, with all these unemployed troops at hand, Hooker was depending upon Sedgwick to advance from Fredericksburg and strike the Confederate rear. Sedgwick, who had with him over twenty thousand men, had been ordered to push Early asi